Trinity Uptown Construction Nearing

Additional funds moves project up three years

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Fort Worth's Trinity River Vision received a big boost this week it the way of $22 million for its Trinity Uptown Project.

    Fort Worth's Trinity River Vision received a $22.3 million boost this week for its Trinity Uptown Project.

    The money completes the funding for three bridges -- at White Settlement Road, Henderson Street and North Main Street.

    "You're not only going to see (traffic) inconveniences, but you're about to see true forward progress, and it's all going to happen in the next 12 months," said JD Granger, executive director of the Trinity River Vision.

    The $22.3 million, announced after a meeting last week in Washington between federal, state, regional and local transportation officials, pays for the White Settlement Road bridge.

    Money was secured for the other two bridges last year. The money means the project's schedule is now moved up by three years.

    "(It's) what people have been hoping the vision will deliver," Granger said. "We're having a discussion right now -- 'Is it time to change the name because it is a reality?'"

    And the first dose of reality will be construction work along Henderson Street and Jacksboro Highway in January. The money also provides a four-lane bypass during that construction to ease traffic in and out of downtown Fort Worth..

    "Next year, all three bridges start; in January, June and December, all three will be under way, so we're very excited about that," Granger said.

    And with construction work finally starting in earnest, new developments won't be far behind he says.

    "Because they can actually be located on the interior canals, I do expect that to happen in two years, you'll see big developments breaking ground down there," Granger said.

    The future developments will also go with the growing number of events happening along the river and around the Panther Island Pavilion.

    More than 30,000 people attended the Fourth of July festivities, and about 1,200 people have attended the Rockin' the River events this summer. Granger even had to add buoys to prevent water skiers on part of the river from getting too close to the festivities.

    "Congestion is a good problem," he said. "You talk about congestion on the highways -- that means growth. Congestion on the river, that means enthusiasm and support. We're very excited about it."