Dallas to Improve Safety on Cedar Springs Road

New crosswalks, flashers coming this month

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The city is painting a crosswalk at one intersection along Cedar Springs Road and adding yellow flashers to two intersections. (Published Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012)

    Change is coming to a busy Dallas street where two pedestrians were run over and killed in recent months.

    Dallas police plan to increase enforcement of speeding and jaywalking along Cedar Springs Road, beginning immediately.

    Cedar Springs Road to Get Additional Safety Features

    [DFW] Cedar Springs Road to Get Additional Safety Features
    The city is painting a crosswalk at one intersection along Cedar Springs Road and adding yellow flashers to two intersections. (Published Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012)

    "We will be paying particular attention to people speeding down the street and people not crossing in the marked crosswalks," Deputy Chief Malik Al'Aziz said.

    On Wednesday, road crews will paint a crosswalk at Knight Street, where one of the pedestrians was killed. Next week, city crews will add bright, yellow flashers at Knight and Reagan streets.

    Cedar Springs Road Hazardous to Foot Traffic

    [DFW] Cedar Springs Road Hazardous to Foot Traffic
    After a series of accidents, there's renewed concerns over pedestrian safety along busy Cedar Springs Road between Wycliff Avenue and Oak Lawn Avenue in Dallas. (Published Wednesday, Dec 28, 2011)

    "This is a solar-powered flasher that's at a vehicle's eye level," said Scott Whitall, executive director of the Cedar Springs Merchants Association.

    Whitall, who helped the city come up with the plan, said the lights should look similar to the ones along Katy Trail.

    In June, the city will add a traffic signal at Knight Street and remove a right-turn lane that's caused trouble.

    "There are short-, mid- and long-term plans," Whitall said. "Long term, we're thinking about maybe making it a two-lane road to really slow down traffic."

    The long-term improvements are three to five years out and subject to available funding and community input.