Corporate America Vs. Texting While Driving

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Several big-name companies are teaming up to cut down on texting while driving. (Published Tuesday, Dec 28, 2010)

    For once, you might want to listen to corporate America.

    Several big-name companies are teaming up to cut down on texting while driving.

    AT&T, Allstate Say, Don't Text While Driving

    [DFW] AT&T, Allstate Say, Don't Text While Driving
    Several big-name companies are teaming up to cut down on texting while driving. (Published Tuesday, Dec 28, 2010)

    Dallas-based AT&T released a 10-minute documentary on the dangers of texting while driving. The video shows the real-life consequences by talking with surviving family members of those killed in distraction crashes.

    "There are 5 billion text messages sent each day. What we would like to do is make sure that is done in a safe environment," said Holly Reed with AT&T. "Texting has become so pervasive that it is important for everybody to get the message out that texting while driving is dangerous and you really do need to be paying attention when you're behind the wheel."

    Teen Drivers Pledge to Use Designated Texter

    [DFW] Teen Drivers Pledge to Use Designated Texter
    To help keep teens safer on the road, Allstate is asking teens to pledge to use a designated texter when behind the wheel. (Published Tuesday, Dec 28, 2010)

    Allstate started its own project, asking teen drivers to pledge to not text while behind the wheel.

    "You can kill someone you love and you can kill someone you don’t know and devastate their family, and it’s not a good thing to do," said 15 year-old Leeann Gunter.

    Gunter was at an Allstate event in Grapevine to sign the pledge and pick up a plastic thumb ring to remind teen drivers to get a designated "texter" when they drive.

    But teenagers don't deserve all the blame Parents say they, too, have texted while driving.

    "I was trying to read it, and i ended up through a ditch and in a field, trying to keep from hitting the person in front of me," mother Carolyn Gunter said.

    State lawmakers are also introducing bills into the new legislative session to make it illegal to text and drive anywhere.