Victory Park Turns Down the Snob Factor

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    Dallas Skyline shows the American Airlines Center, Victory Park and the W Hotel.

    In the hopes of building business back up in the beleaguered development, Victory Park has turned down the snob factor to include new businesses like Hard Rock Cafe, Naga Thai, and Olivella's Neo Pizza Napoletana.

    What do those businesses have in common? They're moderately priced (read: affordable) and don't target the "high-end" consumer.

    Todd Platt, CEO of Hillwood Investments (they own Victory Park), admits to the Dallas Morning News, "we made some mistakes in our earlier retail planning."

    Businesses Losing at Victory Park

    [DFW] Businesses Losing at Victory Park
    Victory Park can't seem to regularly bring in the crowds.

    "Perhaps we addressed too high end a retail user or restaurateur," Platt said.

    You're darn right, you did. Adding restaurants that folks want to go to before a Mavs or Stars game is definitely going help the development, but adding places that some folks can eat at everyday -- like Neo Pizza -- is far superior to bringing and keeping foot traffic into the Park.

    Victory Park's Largest Retailer Shutting Its Doors

    [DFW] Victory Park's Largest Retailer Shutting Its Doors
    Victory Park's largest retailer blames its closing on the struggling economy and a lack of foot traffic in the area.

    Think about it: How many times could you have gone to N9NE for lunch? None. But a pizza place? Sure! Thai? Sure! Hard Rock? Well, maybe.

    It's a good thing some of these other businesses are coming in as the loss of Nove Italiano, N9NE, and LFT left 19% of the development empty.

    The Hard Rock won't take up any of those empty spaces (read more about the Hard Rock return here) -- it's going to occupy a large section of the House condo tower's first floor.

    When our crews were in Victory in February, we saw plenty of empty tables -- as well as many empty businesses -- which caused a few folks to mention lowering the "high-end" target to get more foot traffic.

    Seems like someone finally got the message.