"WORN for Peace" Helps North Texas Refugees

Catholic Charities of Fort Worth launches clothing line to help refugees

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A new clothing company is helping refugees in North Texas earn money, while the woman behind it all is being honored for her work.

    Each year, Catholic Charities of Fort Worth helps roughly 600 refugees make North Texas their new home.

    Refugees in North Texas Knit a Better Life

    [DFW] Refugees in North Texas Knit a Better Life
    The WORN label encourages refugees in North Texas to knit scarves, necklaces, and other items for supplemental income and empowerment.

    Ru Hta Dun, a Burmese refugee, has been living in Fort Worth for nearly three years and is one of 22 refugees from war-torn and poverty-stricken nations knitting scarves and headbands for WORN for Peace.

    Dun turns her passion for knitting, something she has done since she was 11 years old, into something more tangible.

    "Whenever I have stress or I'm bored with something, I'm doing this," said Dun."It's a great opportunities to do in my spare time and I earn money ... that I can spend for my daughter."

    WORN for Peace is a clothing company created by Abbi Ice for the Catholic Charities of Fort Worth.

    Ice said her work overseas and visits to local refugees' homes inspired her to turn their knitted works of art into something more than just a business.

    "It's supplemental income, but it's also empowerment. It's getting back their dignity that they have something to give to us," said Ice.

    Ice said it goes further than fashion -- it's about who is helped when someone buys the fashions.

    "The fact is, the women are right here in our community, and you're giving back in a really cool and tangible way," said Ice.

    Ice received Fort Worth's Outstanding Young Woman of the Year Award at Tuesday night's council meeting.

    "It's humbling. I don't feel like I did anything; I just feel like these women are so awesome and so inspiring to me, and I feel there should be 20 women up there saying, 'Hey this is what we did,' and it shouldn't be about me at all," said Ice.

    The scarves start at about $60 and profits go directly to the refugees and Catholic Charities.

    More: www.WornForPeace.com