10/7: A Madwoman, Four Kings and Rock Royalty

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    L-R Nathan Followill, Jared Followill, Caleb Followill and Matthew Followill of Kings of Leon.

    WHAT JOAN COULD HAVE BEEN: Never mind that Mad Men is named expressly for Madison Avenue advertising powers. For the Dallas Society of Visual Communications' purposes, Nancy Vonk of Ogilvy Toronto qualifies as a Madwoman. She's a co-creative officer of one of the biggest ad agencies in the world (one that has been mentioned on the show via a book by David Ogilvy, who did work on the storied street) and there's a Cannes Grand Prix among the spate of awards to her name. We suspect Vonk's presentation at Cityplace Conference Center will be more inspiring than a monologue by "the female Don." Talk at 7PM after a reception at 6PM. $20 for non-members, $10 for students.

    NEW KINGS: We remember clenching our teeth to keep from arguing with Tim DeLaughter after Kings of Leon played Gyspy Ballroom a few years back. "They're such a great bar band," he offered, clearly having had a great time at the show. Kings of Leon is so much more than a bar band, we wanted to say, sweaty from dancing so hard. (A bar band to the leader of a choral rock symphony, we realize now, is not the same as a bar band to most.) The Southern-rock bred, Pentecostal raised indie rockers were too rough for the masses, but they've added some "oh ohs" and more pop riffs and, poof, they're all over the radio dial and onstage at American Airlines tonight. 7PM.

    ROCKSCAPES: Lynn Goldsmith once photographed Woody Allen with his clarinet for the cover of Jazz Times. In some of the coolest frames of musicians ever captured -- and some of the most delightfully unlikely portraits -- Goldsmith and Janet Macoska teach us about star quality on both sides of the camera in "Music Seen: Rock 'n' Roll Photojournalists," an exhibit at The Women's Museum featuring over 100 photographs of icons like Mick Jagger and Bob Dylan. Admission to the museum is free with admission to the State Fair of Texas, so if you're around from noon to 5PM Tuesday through Sunday, have a look.