Dull Village and Boring Town Launch Partnership

"Everyone has been smiling at the prospect of the very eye-catching road sign this will inevitably require," said a town council member

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    The Scottish village of Dull is partnering with the American town of Boring, Ore., as sister communities. One thing the communities have in common, according to a Boring reporter: "We get a lot of rain and snow every year."

    Dull, meet Boring.

    The tiny Scottish village of Dull has reached out to the town of Boring, Ore., in the hopes of a Dull and Boring — but never tedious — partnership as sister communities, BBC News reported.

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    "It might seem like a joke, but this could have real benefits for Dull," said Marjorie Keddie, a community council member in Dull, which the Daily Mail reported has just a single street, no shops and a population of under 150.

    "Everyone has been smiling at the prospect of the very eye-catching road sign this will inevitably require," Keddie said.

    That could boost tourist traffic in both towns — especially Boring, whose post office clerk Helen Kilty told the Scottish Daily Record, "There isn't really much to do in Boring."

    "We get tourists passing through but mostly they just take a photo beside the Boring sign then leave," Kilty said.

    A Scotswoman who lives near Dull hatched the idea when she passed through Boring on an American bicycle trip. She contacted Boring's community planning chair, who decided to invite Dull to be its sister community.

    Besides their uninspiring names, the towns have one thing in common, at least, said Jim Hart, a reporter for Boring newspaper The Sandy Post.

    "We get a lot of rain and snow every year," he told BBC News.