Swingly Enters Search Engine Mix

Richardson company develops Google competition

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Google Inc. prides itself on setting trends, but it appears to be copying some of its smaller rivals with the latest refinements to the way it displays Internet search results.

    The true measure of a search engine’s acceptance happens when its name becomes a verb. Google, anyone?

    Didn’t happen so much with Metacrawler, but certainly Google now stands as the standard for verbatization.

    Developers at a Richardson company called Language Computer Corp., a government contactor of work we’re better off not knowing about, evidently, this week came out with a new search engine they called “Swingly,” which is going to be hard to verbacize … yesterday, I Swinglied … hmmm.

    Its point of difference from Google is that Swingly uses semantics indexing — OK — to answer questions whereas Google uses, sorry, Googling uses keywords.

    In the example given in this article, finding the name of the first Texas Rangers manger requires a phrase such as “Texas Rangers first manager” to Google. With Swingly, a user just asks, “Who was the first manager of the Texas Rangers?”

    Presto, the answer comes up Mickey Vernon, according to the article, and huh? No, it was Ted Williams, wasn't it?

    Vernon was the first manager of the expansion team Washington Senators before they moved here and became the Rangers.
    Still need a little work, perhaps, before achieving verbatization.

    Bruce Felps owns and operates East Dallas Times, an online community news outlet serving the White Rock Lake area. He’s perfectly fine with the Google.