Mesquite Hosts Several Playoff Games

Some Choose Football and Family Instead of Shopping on Black Friday

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    While some people are out spending money, hundreds and thousands of people are watching high school football playoffs. (Published Friday, Nov 23, 2012)

    On this Black Friday, not everyone is at the mall shopping.

    In Mesquite, hundreds of people are sure spending money for several big high school football games, including the Poteet High School and Dallas Lincoln game.

    If there's two things North Texans love, it's football and family.

    "Football is everything," said Poteet supporter Melissa Shields. "It promotes character in our boys and we wouldn't have it any other way."

    The City of Mesquite is hosting several playoff games this season, and while some are spending money on the biggest shopping day of the year, others are leaving it in Mesquite.

    Business owner James Donahoe says playoffs mean a payoff.

    "It really boosts our business back at Cici's, we'll have huge turnover from all the athletes that will show up and the teams show up by the hundreds and it turns out to be a great profitable day for us," said Donahoe.

    At Memorial Stadium, two matches kicked off Friday, including Poteet High School and Lincoln High School. The stadium has a seating capacity of more than 20,000 people.

    For Poteet, making it to the playoffs is a big score, since they didn't make it last year and principal Karyn Cummings said in the 2008 and 2009 season, the team only won two games

    "It's amazing what that does for the climate of the school and students do better in school, in their classes and they're behavior is better all the way around when there's a winning athletic program," said Cummings.

    Dallas Lincoln is coming from a near perfect football season.

    "It means everything," said Lincoln Supporter Ricky Williams. "It's a family tradition."

    Win or lose, families and fans have undying support, while enjoying another fall Texas tradition.