Complete coverage of the TCU drug bust

Former Horned Frog on Drug Scandal: "Wow"

TCU National Alumni Board member disappointed by drug scandal

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 5
    Terrance Maiden and his twin brother, Tim, played for the Horned Frogs until 2000.

    A TCU National Alumni Board member and former football player said Thursday that he is disappointed by the school's drug scandal.

    Seventeen people accused of selling drugs on or near the university were arrested in an early-morning drug sting Wednesday.

    Drug Arrests Disappoint TCU Alum

    [DFW] Drug Arrests Disappoint TCU Alum
    Terrance Maiden, a TCU National Alumni Board member and former football player says he is disappointed that 17 people were arrested in a drug sting. (Published Monday, Feb 27, 2012)

    Terrance Maiden said his response to the news was, "Wow." It only stung more that four of the people arrested were football players.

    He and his twin brother, Tim, played for the Horned Frogs until 2000.

    Attorney: Drug Sting "Much Ado About Not a Whole Lot"

    [DFW] Attorney: Drug Sting "Much Ado About Not a Whole Lot"
    Critics of the six-month drug investigation at TCU say it went too far, while others say it was long overdue. (Published Thursday, Feb 16, 2012)

    "I look at it as having one of those step-brothers you aren't always so proud of," Maiden said.

    His and his brother's experiences on the field and in the class room have led to professional success. Terrance Maiden is a commercial real estate developer, and his brother is a bank president.

    Together, they founded the Two-Wins Foundation, a charity that helps inner-city children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    The Maidens regularly take students on college tours starting with their alma mater. Now, they have some explaining to do about their university.

    "I think you be honest; you share with the kids that this is still a wonderful university," Terrance Maiden said.

    TCU head coach Gary Patterson was his defensive coordinator. Maiden said he has no doubt that Patterson immediately ordered drug testing upon hearing that athletes could be using drugs.

    Maiden said he suspects the growing pains of success is partly to blame for players getting involved in drugs.

    When TCU was known more as a little school that occasionally beat the big boys, the team always struggled together and stayed humble, he said. He theorized that winning Rose Bowls and finishing atop national polls meant attracting some athletes that put their own desires ahead of the team.

    "A lot of times, with success comes a lot of opportunities to do stuff that is not acceptable," Maiden said.

    TCU and drugs now will be in the same sentence for the foreseeable future, he said.

    "I'm a Horned Frog, and I always will be, through the good and the bad, but unfortunately, we're kind of living through the bad right now," Maiden said.

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