2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

Complete coverage of the 2012 election

Don't Miss Local Props on Election Ballots

Elections administrators want voters to check the entire ballot

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Voters who plan to cast a straight-ticket ballot, could miss some important local issues if they don't look over the entire ballot before casting their vote.

    Voters who plan to cast a straight-ticket ballot, could miss some important local issues if they don't look over the entire ballot before casting their vote.

    Dallas County Elections Administrator Toni Pippins-Poole said that during a presidential election year, sometimes the local issues can get lost at the bottom or on the back of the ballot. 

    “We don’t want you to vote on the nation, state, and county, turn around and ask, ‘Where’s that local ballot?’ You’ve already voted, it’s too late after that.  Those are the local issues that affect you daily,” said Pippins-Poole.

    If you fill in the oval for a straight-party vote, you still have to weigh-in separately on the proposition questions.

    In Dallas, the city is asking voters whether to spend $642 million in bond money on area improvements.  There are three questions about road resurfacing, flood protection and drainage projects, and economic development in south Dallas.

    Voters in Frisco, Prosper, Balch Springs, Cedar Hill, Seagoville, Aubrey and Sanger will decide whether to support or oppose changes to alcohol sales. 

    Cedar Hill can also sound off about using bond money for school buildings and using more sales tax money for crime control and prevention.

    Richardson could change the way it elects the mayor.

    Voters have to vote on each election to be heard.

    “We don’t want you to miss those, make sure you turn your ballot over,” said Pippins-Poole.

    Most counties have a sample ballot on their website that voters can check out before heading to the polls.

    Polling places are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day.