<![CDATA[NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth - Dallas-Fort Worth and Texas State Political News]]> Copyright 2014 http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/politics http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC+5-KXAS+Logo+for+Google+News.png NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth http://www.nbcdfw.com en-us Fri, 21 Nov 2014 04:42:16 -0600 Fri, 21 Nov 2014 04:42:16 -0600 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[City Council Race Ends in Tie]]> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:25:46 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Padilla-McCann-Chula-Vista2.jpg

The razor-thin race for a Chula Vista City Council seat has ended in a tie, two weeks after Election Day, San Diego County officials say.

John McCann and Steve Padilla each won 18,450 votes for the District 1 seat, according to Wednesday's last tally from the San Diego County Registrar of Voters. The registrar reports there aren't any other provisional ballots left to be counted that could break that tie.

Ultimately, it will be up to the city of Chula Vista to determine who takes the seat.

Padilla said his campaign is pleased with the results from the provisional ballots.

“We’re just focused on making sure every vote is counted,” Padilla said.

However, McCann told NBC 7 on Wednesday he believes what he called "dirty politics" played a role.

“We had over 900-point lead and every day it seems to continuously vanish. Obviously it raises some questions,” McCann told NBC 7.

The registrar's office will begin making sure all the votes are accurately counted ahead of the Dec. 2 deadline for certifying results.

While Chula Vista is be the second-largest city in San Diego County, the city council race came down to the narrowest of margins as the final 1,000 county-wide provisional ballots were counted Wednesday.

Check back for updates on this developing story.

]]>
<![CDATA[Lone Star Politics: November 16, 2014]]> Sun, 16 Nov 2014 08:50:03 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NEW+013114+lone+star+politics.jpg On Lone Star Politics this week, three of Texas’ most respected journalists, Wayne Slater and Rudy Bush from The Dallas Morning News, and KERA Managing Editor Shelley Kofler, discuss how Gov.-elect Greg Abbott, Lt. Gov.-elect Dan Patrick, and likely House Speaker Joe Straus will work together. Finally, Rodger Jones, Editorial Writer for The Dallas Morning News, discusses how you can help the newspaper pick the Texan of the Year. Watch Lone Star Politics Sunday at 8:40 a.m. on NBC 5. ]]> <![CDATA[The DMN's Rudy Bush on Upcoming Texas Legislation]]> Wed, 12 Nov 2014 12:19:28 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/DMN_-_Texas_Legislature_11a_111214_1200x675_356965443637.jpg The Dallas Morning News editorial writer Rudy Bush discusses what we might see in the upcoming Texas Legislature session. ]]> <![CDATA[Tax Cuts, Immigration, Guns: TX Legislature Bills]]> Wed, 12 Nov 2014 12:21:42 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/texas-capitol-tex1sam.jpg

Republicans made clear their intent Monday to slash taxes for businesses, tighten laws on those in the country illegally and allow open carry of handguns, as lawmakers began introducing measures for the Texas Legislature to consider in January.

CLICK HERE to read more from our media partners at The Dallas Morning News.



Photo Credit: flickr/tex1sam]]>
<![CDATA[Lone Star Politics for November 9, 2014]]> Sun, 09 Nov 2014 21:20:09 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NEW+013114+lone+star+politics.jpg On this week’s Lone Star Politics, the interview you will not see anywhere else: In his first-election comments, Wendy Davis’ campaign manager Chris Turner talks about her inability to get crossover votes in the race for governor. Plus, Republican consultant Bryan Eppstein explains how he managed to predict EIGHT MONTHS ago that Davis would fail to get forty percent of the vote. Finally, Gromer Jeffers and Wayne Slater from The Dallas Morning News examine what went wrong with the Davis campaign. Watch Lone Star Politics Sunday at 8:40 a.m. on NBC]]> <![CDATA[LSP: Columnists Examine What Went Wrong For Wendy Davis]]> Sun, 09 Nov 2014 08:53:03 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NEW+013114+lone+star+politics.jpg On this week’s Lone Star Politics, two columnists with The Dallas Morning News, Wayne Slater and Gromer Jeffers, weigh in on what went wrong with the Wendy Davis campaign for governor. Plus, the interview you will not see anywhere else: Davis campaign manager Chris Turner speaks out for the first time since the election. Also, Republican consultant Bryan Eppstein explains how he managed to predict EIGHT MONTHS ago that Davis would fail to get forty percent of the vote. Watch Lone Star Politics Sunday at 8:40 a.m. on NBC]]> <![CDATA[Weary Rivals in SoCal Race Hopeful]]> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 10:15:14 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/DeMaio-Peters-June-Primary.jpg

The long, divisive road to the 52nd Congressional District seat stretches on for its two weary candidates, incumbent U.S. Rep. Scott Peters and former San Diego city councilman Carl DeMaio, as officials prepare Thursday to start counting around 46,000 still-uncounted ballots.

Exhausted by a late election night that left DeMaio leading by just 752 votes, both candidates are trying to put a positive spin on the numbers.

“This is a historically bad night for Democrats, turnout historically low, and the fact that we're even close is a miracle. I think we're going to win this thing," Peters said at a news conference Wednesday evening.

The initial surge of results had DeMaio in the lead, but as the late ballots came in Tuesday night, the trend was in favor of Peters.

But DeMaio was just as confident that his campaign will come out on top.

“I believe when all votes are counted, we will prevail, and I will have the honor of being San Diego’s voice in the U.S. Congress,” he said at a Wednesday morning news conference.

The San Diego County Registrar of Voters says there were 36,000 mail-in ballots and 10,000 provisional ballots from the 52nd District to be counted, and all were sorted Wednesday.

On Thursday, the counting starts on those 46,000 ballots. Both candidates are sending representatives to make sure each vote is counted correctly.

The registrar is expected to release more numbers Thursday evening, and a final winner should be announced Monday.

But even after the ballots were cast, the biting comments remained.

When asked if he is prepared for a recount in the event of a very close final tally, DeMaio replied, “After what Mr. Peters has done in this campaign, I wouldn’t be surprised by anything.”

Peters’ response later in the day: “I think the campaign's over now. We can get past the hard feelings, stop whining. You know, let's just count the votes."

With nothing to do but wait, both candidates had time to reflect on their contentious campaigns and their plans for the future.

DeMaio will be hopping a plane to Washington, D.C., next week to attend the Congressional freshman orientation.

“What I emphasized last night was that my candidacy hopefully is the beginning of the Republican Party becoming more inclusive, of us getting past labels and putting people in boxes,” the gay candidate said.

While DeMaio zeroed in on reforming his own party, Peters said his focus will be reaching across the aisle in the now Republican-led Congress.

"Well the middle is my territory. I don't think there's enough of us who want to be in the middle,” he said. “I think one of the problems with Congress is it's so polarized and what I offer is a promise that I will always work with anybody."

Voters will continue to watch the results of the race closely, but the end of election season brings one thing both sides can be thankful for: no more political ads.

]]>
<![CDATA[The DMN's Rudy Bush on Election Night]]> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 12:04:54 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Election_State_of_Texas_1200x675_353040963800.jpg The Dallas Morning News editorial writer Rudy Bush discusses what happened during Tuesday night's elections. (Nov. 5, 2014)]]> <![CDATA[Arlington, Fort Worth Pass $680 Million in Propositions]]> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 09:49:48 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/ftw-arena.jpg

Arlington and Fort Worth residents voted to approve nearly $680 million in propositions to improve the cities overnight.

In Arlington, Props 1-4, which account for $236 million in improvements to streets, parks, fire facilities and the library system, passed by a wide margin.

“Residents have always been very helpful in furthering the quality of life in Arlington, and this bond election helps us meet those goals,” said Mayor Robert N. Cluck, M.D. “I think residents understand the benefits of saying ‘yes,’ and it doesn’t raise their tax rate.”

City of Arlington, Prop. 1: The issuance of $160.13 million general obligation bonds for street improvements and the levying of a tax in payment thereof.

City of Arlington, Prop. 2: The issuance of $60 million general obligation bonds for park, open space and recreation improvements and the levy of a tax in payment thereof.

Specifically the propositions call for proposed projects to include aquatic/recreation centers in Southeast and East Arlington, a library and an off-leash dog park in West Arlington.

City of Arlington, Prop. 3: The issuance of $9.78 million general obligation bonds for fire fighting facilities, and the levying of a tax in payment thereof.

City of Arlington, Prop. 4: The issuance of $6.09 million general obligation bonds for library improvements, and the levying of a tax in payment thereof.

In Tarrant County, Fort Worth voters approved three propositions having to do with the construction and renovation of a $450 million, 14,000-seat multipurpose arena in the city's Cultural District.

Measures approved Tuesday will help fund about 15 percent of the complex.

Voters endorsed an admission tax on each ticket to events at the arena. Voters also approved a parking tax, topped at $5 per vehicle, at the site expected to be built next to the Will Rogers Memorial Center. Another tax will apply to each stall or pen used by livestock at the arena.

Fort Worth and Tarrant County have already spent about $10 million for storm drain and road improvements. Hotel and mixed-beverage related taxes will also help fund the arena.

Fort Worth, Proposition 1: Authorizing the City of Fort Worth to provide for the planning, acquisition, establishment, development, construction and renovation of a multipurpose arena at the intersection of Harley Avenue and Gendy Street and other adjacent support facilities as a venue project, and to impose an admissions tax on each ticket sold as admission to an event held at the venue project, at a rate not to exceed 10 percent of the price of the ticket, for the purpose of financing the venue project.

Fort Worth, Proposition 2: Authorizing the City of Fort Worth to provide for the planning, acquisition, establishment, development, construction and renovation of a multipurpose arena at the intersection of Harley Avenue and Gendy Street and other adjacent support facilities as a venue project, and to impose a livestock facility use tax on each stall or pen used or occupied by livestock during an event held on one or more consecutive days in which the venue project is used, not to exceed $20 in the aggregate per stall or pen rental for any event, for the purpose of financing the venue project.

Fort Worth, Proposition 3: Authorizing the City of Fort Worth to provide for the planning, acquisition, establishment, development, construction and renovation of a multipurpose arena at the intersection of Harley Avenue and Gendy Street and other adjacent support facilities as a venue project, and to impose a parking tax on each motor vehicle parking in a parking facility that serves or will serve the venue project, not to exceed $5 for each motor vehicle, for the purpose of financing the venue project.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[Jenkins Defeats Natinsky in County Judge Race]]> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 13:18:22 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/457249392.jpg

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins garnered enough votes Tuesday to defeat challenger Ron Natinsky in his re-election race to lead the county. 

Jenkins will remain in office after earning 55 percent of the vote compared to Natinsky's 43 percent.

Libertarian candidate Preston Poulter earned about 2 percent of the vote.

The Dallas Morning News' political reporter Gromer Jeffers tweeted earlier Tuesday evening that Jenkins had won the election and had too much of a lead for Natinsky to overcome.

To see up-to-the-minute returns from nearly 200 races across Texas, click here.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[Polls Close Across Texas, El Paso Remains Open]]> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 19:14:10 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/abbott-davis.jpg

The polls in Texas are closed except for the far west portion of the state.

Areas around El Paso are also open as scheduled until 8 p.m. Central Time.

Polls across Texas opened as normal Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., with election results expected to come in shortly afterward.

Texas' race for governor between Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis is being closely watched nationally to see whether Democrats were successful in making inroads against Republicans who have controlled top state offices for two decades.

To see up-to-the-minute returns from nearly 200 races across Texas, click here.



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[DMN, NBC 5 Election Night Webcast]]> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 19:30:58 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/dallasnews-webcast.jpg

Beginning at 7 p.m. we will simulcast a DallasNews.com live stream of election coverage, monitoring results and trends as they develop throughout the night.

The live stream of the broadcast will appear in the player above.

Taking part in The Dallas Morning News' webcast are NBC 5 political reporters Kevin Cokely and Julie Fine. For The News, political analysis will come from Gromer Jeffers Jr. and Rodger Jones in Dallas; Wayne Slater, Christy Hoppe and Robert Garrett in Austin; and Todd Gillman in Washington.

The webcast will be hosted by Doug Fox, a longtime TV political reporter.

Watch live, beginning at 7 p.m. here or on DallasNews.com.

To see the live, up-to-the-minute returns from nearly 200 races, click here.



Photo Credit: DallasNews.com]]>
<![CDATA[WATCH: Tot Wants to Vote ]]> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 07:35:20 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/195*120/Xavier+cries+p1.jpg

Xavier is only 3 years old.

He cannot legally vote for another 15 years. 

But Xavier is passionate about the democratic process. 

The tyke went with his mom, Erica Hallman Nagy to vote this morning near Grande Reserve Elementary in Yorkville, Illinois, and was visibly upset over the fact that he can't cast a ballot -- or get one of those stickers.

Just when it seems like Xavier is coming to grips with his lack of a role in choosing his elected officials, his mom drops a bombshell. 

"Did you know there's people out there who can vote that just don't?" she says.

Information about derelict voters is too much for Xavier to handle, and the kid loses it. 

The moral of this story: Go vote -- it's important and you get stickers. 

]]>
<![CDATA[Connecticut's Last Dry Town No More: Vote Reverses Alcohol Ban]]> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:18:31 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/beer+bottles+generic+edit.jpg

Voters in the Connecticut town of Bridgewater made the historic decision Tuesday to end prohibition and reverse an alcohol ban in the state's last dry town.

Some residents have bars in their garages but the affluent town, which is home to actress Mia Farrow and a large weekend population of people from New York City, currently does not have a restaurant aside from a village store with a delicatessen.

The question arose last winter when Bridgewater faced the prospect of losing its only school and began searching for a way to breathe life back into the community.

Today, Bridgewater residents passsed the measure allowing alcohol sales at restaurants by a vote of 608 to 226, according to First Selectman Curtis Read.  Absentee ballots still needed to be counted Tuesday night.

The question on the ballot read:

"Shall the Town of Bridgewater adopt the following ordinance: The town of Bridgewater shall allow the sale of alcoholic liquor in all establishments operating under restaurant or café permits only between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday; between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 12:00 midnight on Friday and Saturday; between the hours of 12:00 noon and 10:00 p.m. on Sunday; and between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. on New Year's Eve?"

Businesses with restaurant or café permits will now be allowed to sell liquor between 11 a.m. and 11 p.m., Monday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday and between noon and 10 p.m. on Sunday, as well as 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. on New Year's Eve.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Election Officials: Rain Not Deterring Voters]]> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 11:33:44 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/VOTER+ID+IMAGE.jpg

Tuesday's wet weather was not ideal for election day, but election officials said they hope numbers will remain high.

At the Riverside Community Center on East Belknap Street in Fort Worth, turn out remained high despite the weather. Tarrant County Election Administrator Frank Phillips said rain usually keeps some people from voting.

"I am encouraged our early voting numbers were high, so I think the governor's race is driving that," Phillips said. "Hopefully that will still get people to come out today regardless of the weather."

Phillips said they are prepared just in case the weather does get worse.

"We actually have four generators," said Phillips. "If there is a site that does go down, we immediately dispatch that generator to get that site back up, so we can continue to keep voting. Hopefully we won't run into that scenario."

Phillips said they have actually added more polling locations in Tarrant County to better meet the demand.



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>
<![CDATA[Voter ID Concerns on Election Eve]]> Mon, 03 Nov 2014 19:26:04 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/VOTER+ID+IMAGE.jpg

The first Texas general election to be held under the state’s new voter identification law comes Tuesday and some voters are concerned about the new rules.

Duncanville voter Jennifer Fulbright said she was turned away in a municipal election this year because a minor discrepancy between her driver license and voter registration.

Then, voting early last month she was concerned when poll workers insisted on scanning her driver license, but could not answer her questions about how the information would be used.

“What is that information actually hooked up to, so once you scan it, where is the information going to, ok? And is it tied in to how I voted?”

Assistant Dallas County Election Administrator Robert Heard said ID’s are normally scanned only in early voting and only to read the voter’s information faster by computer.

“I can assure them that that information is very safe. That information is kept. It’s not going online. It’s not going anywhere,” he said.

Heard said the Election Department operates a dual data system that separates registration information from election results.

“We can tell that they voted. We can’t tell how they voted or what they voted for,” he said.

But, Fulbright’s ID discrepancy in the Duncanville city election should not have been enough to turn her away, according to officials.

Her driver license showed her middle name as only an initial while her voter registration included the full middle name.

Heard said the state considers that “substantially similar.”

“That should have been OK, and I would say to that voter, she should have called the Elections Department,” he said.

Election officials have been training poll workers to properly use the new law in the general election Tuesday, when higher turnout is expected to provide the largest test of the new requirements so far.

Dallas County Election Administrator Toni Pippins-Poole had forecasted as many as 37 percent of registered voters would cast ballots but rainy weather expected now could dampen voter interest.

“Voters like that perfect weather, but if there’s rain, there’s cold, they tend to think it’s not worth getting out into the rain or standing in line,” she said.

Even with an open governor seat up for grabs in this general election, Pippins-Poole said early voting was 10,000 votes behind the pace of 198,000 set four years ago.

But 27,000 mail-in ballots received so far are 6,000 ahead of the number four years ago and mail-in ballots can still be received through Tuesday evening.

If rain further hampers election day turn out, poll workers must be ready to handle returns in the rain. They’re provided with ponchos to help them prepare.

“So it goes on, whether its snow, sleet, rain, we’re just like the post office, we have to deliver,” Pippins-Poole said.

Fulbright said she believes the voter ID rules also discourage in person voting.

“A lot of people are hesitant now about going down to vote, based on all of this,” she said.



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.]]>