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Sleep Aid Found in Kerry Kennedy's Blood

She said a week ago that her doctors though a seizure caused the accident

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    AP
    Kerry Kennedy, ex-wife of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, speaks after she appeared at the North Castle Justice Court in Armonk, N.Y. Tuesday, July 17, 2012. Kennedy was arrested Friday after state police said her Lexus struck a tractor-trailer on Interstate 684 north of New York. Police said she drove the damaged car off the highway before it became disabled. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

    A sleeping aid was found in Kerry Kennedy's blood after her recent auto accident on a highway in Westchester County, N.Y., according to court papers filed in her case.

    The document shows that zolpidem, which is sold under the brand name Ambien, among others, was found in her blood. No alcohol was found in her urine, the document shows.

    Kerry Kennedy Arrested for Allegedly Driving Under the Influence of Drugs

    [NY] Kerry Kennedy Arrested for Allegedly Driving Under the Influence of Drugs
    Kerry Kennedy, the ex-wife of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, was arrested in Westchester Friday morning for allegedly driving under the influence of drugs, police said. Pei-Sze Cheng has more. (Published Friday, Jul 13, 2012)

    A spokeswoman for attorney John J. Pappalardo says his office is now representing Kerry Kennedy, and they have no comment as of now on the drug test results filed with the court.   

    The ex-wife of Gov. Andrew Cuomo said a week ago that her doctors thought a seizure caused the July 11 accident. She said their tests found no alcohol, recreational drugs or prescription medication in her system.

    She acknowledged, however, that she told a police officer she might have taken an Ambien by accident instead of her thyroid medication.

    Dr. Donald Hoffman, a forensic toxicologist associated with John Jay College, said the amount of zolpidem in Kennedy's blood -- 14 nanograms per milliliter -- would represent a small amount left in the system of a person who earlier took a 5 mg tablet of Ambien. Kennedy's blood was tested more than three hours after the crash.

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