<![CDATA[NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth - National & International News]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/national-internationalhttp://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC+5-KXAS+Logo+for+Google+News.pngNBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worthhttp://www.nbcdfw.comen-usMon, 24 Jul 2017 01:39:51 -0500Mon, 24 Jul 2017 01:39:51 -0500NBC Owned Television Stations<![CDATA[World's Oldest-Known Manatee Dies in 'Heartbreaking Accident']]>Sun, 23 Jul 2017 20:39:20 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/240*120/072317+snooty.png

Snooty, the world’s oldest known manatee, died Saturday in what the South Florida Museum called a "heartbreaking accident," just one day after celebrating his 69th birthday

The museum in Bradenton made the announcement Sunday afternoon in a statement on its website and in social media postings.

“Our initial findings indicate that Snooty’s death was a heartbreaking accident and we’re all quite devastated about his passing,” museum CEO Brynne Anne Besio said in the statement.

Besio added that the museum staff members "deeply mourn his passing."

Early indications show that an underwater door leading to a plumbing area, which is normally bolted shut, had been dislodged. Snooty was able to swim in but was not able to get out.

The animal was no longer alive when workers got to him. Three other, smaller manatees that also swam in were able to swim out.

Officials are investigating the exact circumstances of Snooty's death and how the door opened. The museum's aquarium remained closed on Sunday.

A necropsy, or an animal autopsy, will be performed at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory in St. Petersburg. 

Snooty, according to the museum, was born July 21, 1948, and was the first manatee born in captivity. He became the mascot of Florida's Manatee County in 1979 and welcomed more than a million visitors in his lifetime.

Snooty also participated in scientific research programs that studied manatee biology and behavior.



Photo Credit: South Florida Museum]]>
<![CDATA[Royal Family Photos: Prince George Celebrates 4th Birthday]]>Sat, 22 Jul 2017 22:18:40 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_17202510180010.jpgA look through the years at the royal family.

Photo Credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images via AP]]>
<![CDATA[The Costumes of Comic-Con]]>Fri, 21 Jul 2017 19:15:01 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/DIT+COMIC+CON+Costumes+THUMB.jpg

One of the key attractions at any Comic-Con is the fan-made costumes. NBC talked to a few attendees about what inspired their look and how much it cost to put it all together.

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<![CDATA[Prosecutor Remembers Personal Costs of 1995 Simpson Trial]]>Mon, 24 Jul 2017 01:31:09 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_95092901209.jpg

After O.J. Simpson was granted parole in highly covered hearing Thursday, Christopher Darden recalled the personal costs he paid for being one of the Los Angeles prosecutors who tried the 1994 homicide case against the former athlete.

The former prosecutor spoke with NBC News about that famous case, saying it was "a very dangerous time" for him. Darden explained that he and his family were harassed and threatened by those who didn't agree with the prosecution.

With race at the center of the case, Darden said he knew it was "a no-win situation." And after agreeing to join the prosecution team, he said he had come to be seen as a "traitor" to his own race.

"I was in a constant state of anger," Darden said.



Photo Credit: Reed Saxon/AP/pool, File]]>
<![CDATA[Trump's First 6 Months: His Wins, Losses and Stalemates]]>Thu, 20 Jul 2017 07:32:10 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-816483790.jpg

President Donald Trump took office promising a pivot for the country on everything from health care to immigration, a transfer of power not from one administration to another but from Washington, D.C., to the American people.

In his inaugural address, Trump said the United States must protect against other countries stealing companies and jobs, and vowed prosperity and strength.

"From this day forward, it’s going to be America first -- America first," he said. "Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families."

Anne Norton, the chairwoman of the political science department at the University of Pennsylvania, said that, symbolically, Trump has met the expectations of his supporters and those who voted for him as a protest.

"They believe he is 'sticking it to the man' both in Washington and abroad," Norton said. "When he tweets things his critics regard as offensive or ridiculous or outright falsehoods -- that's all to the good for them. The more provocative he is, even the more he profits from his office, the better they like it."


But for those looking for policy changes, he has not met expectations, Norton said.

"He hasn't displaced the elites, he hasn't built the wall, he hasn't done a whole series of things that they want him to do and most importantly, he hasn't found them jobs," she said. 

Trump and the Congressional Republicans had a significant and very public failure this week when the U.S. Senate failed to repeal Obamacare and replace it with an alternate health care bill. Plus, Trump's administration has been rocked by revelations of contacts with Russian officials and clashes in the federal courts. His $4.1 trillion spending plan, with deep domestic spending cuts, has little chance in Congress.

His promises of tax cuts and infrastructure projects are still to come. Observers are saying that Trump needs a win in tax reform to show a legislative success.


Though the legislative scorecard is lacking, Trump has had other victories, particularly on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Here's a look at his progress so far.

HEALTH CARE

Repeal and Replace, or Just Repeal?
Republicans failed to come through on their promise, and Trump’s, to repeal and replace "Obamacare" when the U.S. Senate version for a replacement bill collapsed on Tuesday. Two senators — Mike Lee of Utah and Jerry Moran of Kansas — announced they would not support the new health care bill, a vote on which had been delayed while Sen. John McCain recovered from surgery, which led to a brain tumor diagnosis for the senator.

Two other senators, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Susan Collins of Maine — had already come out against the bill — which would have allowed insurers to sell low-cost, bare bones plans but included deep cuts Medicaid. Only one additional defection was needed to doom it because Senate Democrats all opposed it. The House bill, narrowly approved in May, would leave 23 million more people without insurance than under the Affordable Care Act. 

A fallback plan to pass a straight repeal also fell apart. 


FOREIGN AFFAIRS

ISIS' Shrinking State
Trump saw the defeat of ISIS in Mosul, Iraq's second largest city and one of ISIS's strongholds, last week after a nine-month battle. But the terrorist group still holds significant territory in Syria and in Iraq, particularly the Syrian city of Raqqa, which it declared its capital.

During the campaign, Trump once said he would "bomb the hell" out of ISIS and ordered his generals to submit a plan for defeating ISIS within 30 days. The Pentagon sent him a preliminary one on Feb. 27.


Iran's Nuclear Deal
During the campaign, Trump criticized the nuclear agreement with Iran as "the worst deal ever." But since taking office, he has twice certified its compliance with the deal.

He continues to say that his administration wants to strengthen the deal. His administration is preparing new economic sanctions against Iran because of its ballistic missile program and its adding to regional tensions.


ECONOMY

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs, Jobs
Trump got good news on one of his main campaign pledges when the government reported that 222,000 jobs had been added in June, though some manufacturers will continue to send jobs overseas. Ford Motors, for example, announced it would produce its Focus model in China. And though the jobless rate rose slightly, that was because job seekers who had given up returned.


Other Economic Measures
Put the stock market in the positive column for the Trump team, as it's hit record levels several times during his presidency, including last week. And a report from the Federal Reserve at the beginning of July found that the U.S. economy was growing steadily, though still faces problems: Investment levels remain low, productivity is growing slowly, and pay is rising slowly.

The Associated Press disputed Trump's contention that "no matter where you look, the economy is blazing." "At best, it's a controlled burn," an AP fact check said. The economy grew at a sluggish annual rate of 1.4 percent during the first three months of the year and Federal Reserve officials are predicting the economy will grow by 2.2 percent this year, leaving the 4 percent annual growth Trump has predicted elusive.

THE COURTS

Tilting Right on the Supreme Court
One of Trump’s clear victories has been the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. Trump had promised to nominate federal judges “in the mold of Justice (Antonin) Scalia.”  Gorsuch, who voted to allow an Arkansas inmate to be put to death and was in favor of allowing all of Trump’s travel ban to take effect while the court considers it, has already been one of the most conservative justices on the high court.

He replaced Scalia after Republicans in the U.S. Senate refused to consider President Barack Obama’s pick, Merrick Garland. Trump has the chance to fill more than 120 openings on the federal courts — a result of the slow pace with which Republicans took up Obama’s nominees.


IMMIGRATION

Walling off Mexico
Throughout the campaign, Trump promised a wall along the more than 1,900-mile U.S.-Mexico border that Mexico would pay for. That wall recently shrunk to 700 to 900 miles after Trump told reporters on July 13 that natural barriers and other factors make a longer one unnecessary. There is already a fence along nearly 700 miles of the border. The wall, for which House Republicans have budgeted $1.6 billion to begin construction, could include solar panels and would need to be transparent so drugs couldn’t be thrown over it, Trump said. So far, Mexico is refusing to pay.


Banning Travel from Mostly Muslim Countries
Trump’s campaign call for barring all Muslims from entering the United States has been scaled back and the administration would now ban people from certain predominantly Muslim countries. But even that has run afoul of the federal courts, which blocked implementation of the initial ban and a subsequent revised version.

At the end of June, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed some parts to go forward until it could hear arguments on the policy but left the details to the Trump administration. On July 13, a federal judge in Hawaii expanded categories to allow in grandparents and other close relatives, a decision the U.S. Supreme Court upheld on Wednesday. The case pits the president’s authority to limit immigration against protection from discrimination based on religious beliefs or national origin.


Arresting Undocumented Immigrants
Arrests of immigrants jumped 40 percent, according to a government report released in May, with the largest arrest spike in immigrants with no criminal offense other than being undocumented.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers have arrested more than 41,000 people since January — at an average of 400 arrests a day, according to a report by ICE.

The increase came though Trump had said that his immigration crackdown would focus heavily on criminals, "bad hombres" and public safety. 

CLIMATE CHANGE

Methane Regulation
The Trump administration’s efforts to roll back dozens of environmental regulations put in place by President Barack Obama hit a legal setback at the beginning of July when a federal appeals court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency could not suspend a rule to restrict methane emissions from new oil and gas wells. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt had imposed a two-year moratorium on parts of the regulation, but the court ruled that his decision was unreasonable, arbitrary and capricious. The EPA must instead go through a new, exhaustive rule-making process.

Paris Agreement
Trump made good on his campaign pledge to cancel the Paris climate accord last month when he announced the United States would withdraw from the agreement. And though he said he wanted a better deal for the United States, the leaders of France, German and Italy responded that the 2015 pact was not open for renegotiation.

Trump described the agreement, adopted by 195 countries, as “draconian” and said it imposed unfair standards on the U.S. businesses. The United States was to have cut its greenhouse gas emissions 26 to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. It also would have committed up to $3 billion in aid for poorer countries by 2020.


Keystone XL Pipeline
Trump approved the Keystone XL Pipeline in March, reversing a decision by President Barack Obama on the controversial project opposed by environmentalists and some Native Americans.

Trump said the pipeline's construction would bring new jobs, lower energy costs and reduce U.S. reliance on foreign oil.




Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Top 10 Donald Trump Google Searches During His First 6 Months in Office]]>Thu, 20 Jul 2017 07:56:52 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/200*120/trumpsimotweet.jpg

Google shared their top U.S. searches involving President Trump heading into his six-month anniversary in office. Can you guess the most-searched term or phrase?

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<![CDATA[GOP Legislative Agenda Stalled Amid Ideological Divides]]>Sun, 23 Jul 2017 05:41:23 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/senate-gop.jpg

Despite having control of both chambers of Congress and the White House, Republicans are struggling to pass major aspects their legislative agenda and face many issues that interfere with the party's ability to govern, NBC News reported.

In Congress, Republicans face differences within party on health care reform, a dynamic that threatens to intrude on other major issues like the federal budget. At the White House, President Donald Trump has been fixated on investigations, leaving him an ineffective chief spokesperson for the party and their ideas.

Party unity on key issues has proven elusive for a party with widespread ideologies, ranging from northeast centrists to religious conservatives, fiscal conservatives and small-government libertarians.

That dynamic has stymied the GOP on health care, an issue that appeared simple for the past seven years on the campaign trial and when Trump promised it would be done "on day one."



Photo Credit: Alex Brandon/AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Who's Who in the Trump-Russia Investigation]]>Wed, 19 Jul 2017 09:24:52 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/russiathumb2.jpg

A special counsel is overseeing the federal investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, which is also examining whether anyone in President Donald Trump's campaign colluded with the Russians.

Here's a look at some of the Americans whose names come up often in connection with the investigation.




Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Rookie From New Jersey Wins 2017 World Series of Poker]]>Sun, 23 Jul 2017 07:48:51 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_17204287121151.jpg

A recent Temple University graduate took his place atop the poker world early Sunday by winning the world's biggest poker tournament — and hauling in $8 million.

Scott Blumstein, a native of northern New Jersey who lives outside Atlantic City, took down the last two competitors at the final table of the 2017 World Series of Poker main event in Las Vegas. He held a commanding lead going into the final night of play that started Saturday evening, and was one of more than 7,000 that started the tournament.

The 25-year-old, who was described by Poker News as "an East Coast tournament grinder," entered the night with a commanding lead. A grinder is a player who spends a lot of time at the poker table and who considers poker a career.

The win "changes my life," he told ESPN, which broadcast the event.

"I'm really happy with how I played tonight," Blumstein said. "Really happy with the result, really happy with the deuce, because I was playing good, but I'm pretty tired of poker at this point, honestly. To have to go back and battle pretty deep-[stacked] again, I wasn't looking forward to it."

Entering Saturday, Blumstein had 226 million chips, compared to the second-place chip-holder Dan Ott's 88 million and Benjamin Pollack's 45 million.

Ott is also a Pennsylvanian who hails from Altoona. Pollack is a French poker professional.

Despite the win, Blumstein isn't getting overly confident just yet.

"If you had to ask me, probably the two guys I would least want to get three-handed with," Blumstein told ESPN. "But with that being said, I have a lot of chips and I'm confident we're going to go home, work on some three-handed poker, and come back ready to play tomorrow."

Blumstein graduated from Temple three years ago with a degree in accounting. According to his Twitter account, he's a "professional liver."

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He'll likely be a professional poker player for the considerable future. 

The $8.15 million isn't be his first big score in a poker tournament. He won nearly $200,000 in a tournament at the Borgata in Atlantic City last year.

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Photo Credit: AP Photo/John Locher
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<![CDATA[Pokémon Go Fest Attendees Refunded as Glitches Plague Event]]>Sun, 23 Jul 2017 11:19:05 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Pokemon+Go+Fest+-+10005609_28152926.png

Thousands of people descended on Chicago Saturday for Pokémon Go Fest – an event that was billed as a celebration of the smartphone game’s first year but instead became a debacle plagued by massive lines and connectivity issues.

Organized by the game’s developer, Niantic, the all-day festival in Grant Park was the company’s first official live event for players of the augmented reality game.

However, upon arrival, the roughly 20,000 attendees were met with hours-long lines to enter the festival, and then technical problems preventing play once inside the event.

Niantic’s chief marketing officer addressed the crowd to boos in the late morning, citing three specific problems that rendered attendees unable to access the game.

“One is a network issue. One of the providers is trying to pump in some more bandwidth so that’s something that we’re working with them closely on,” CMO Mike Quigley said onstage.

“The other two issues are on the Niantic side. There’s a crash bug issue that we’ve identified. I know some of you have had that issue, as well as an authentication issue, so we’ve got it completely pinpointed to those three things.”

Quigley said the company would offer players a refund on the $20 ticket price, as well as $100 in the game credit Pokecoins.

However, even with a refund, many attendees – some of whom traveled to Chicago from around the world – will only receive a fraction of what they actually paid.

Tickets to the festival, which promised rare Pokémon encounters, special challenges and exclusive rewards, sold out in just minutes last month.

Many were then listed for resale on sites like eBay for as high as $400.

Despite the connectivity issues, the festival was scheduled to continue as planned while the engineering team worked on a fix, Quigley said.



Photo Credit: NBC Chicago]]>
<![CDATA[Donald Trump Through the Years]]>Mon, 22 May 2017 15:02:14 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Trumpthumb.jpgWhat Donald Trump's presidency will look like is unclear to many observers. He has not previously worked in politics, and has made contradictory statements on policy issues in several areas during his campaign. Despite the unknowns, Trump has an extensive public profile that, along with his real estate empire and the Trump brand, grew domestically and internationally over the last few decades. Here is a look at the president-elect's personal and career milestones and controversies.

Photo Credit: AP, Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Top News Photos: Providing Health Services to Uninsured]]>Fri, 21 Jul 2017 20:10:14 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-820235234.jpgView daily updates on the best photos in domestic and foreign news.

Photo Credit: John Moore/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Back-Slapping Hedge Fund Magnate Scaramucci Reaches WH]]>Fri, 21 Jul 2017 15:07:40 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/scarAP_17202665084579.jpg

Anthony Scaramucci, the back-slapping Wall Street hedge fund magnate, is a long-time Republican donor and fundraiser who once criticized Donald J. Trump, the presidential candidate, CNBC reported.

But he eventually became one of Trump's biggest defenders, and after months of delays he is finally getting what he has worked for behind the scenes since last year: a position in the Trump White House.

He was originally going to be a White House adviser and liaison to the business community. That didn't happen. Then he was offered the post of U.S. ambassador to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. That didn't happen. In June, he was named chief strategy officer of the Export-Import Bank.

Now, he is White House communications director.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Can the President Pardon Himself? Good Question]]>Sat, 22 Jul 2017 06:45:10 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/foto+generica+fachada+casa+blanca+2.jpg

The Constitution grants an absolute, unilateral pardon power to the president for federal offenses and courts have upheld pardons of people even before charges had been filed, NBC News reported.

The Washington Post reported Thursday that President Donald Trump asked advisers about his power to pardon aides, family members and even himself in connection with special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russia. NBC has not confirmed the report.

But could the president pardon himself? There isn't court precedent on the question, NBC News reported. The Department of Justice has in the past provided legal guidance stating that the president cannot be indicted in office, but can be indicted when he leaves office.

Saturday morning Trump tweeted: "While all agree the U. S. President has the complete power to pardon, why think of that when only crime so far is LEAKS against us.FAKE NEWS"



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Donald Trump's Presidency in Photos]]>Thu, 20 Jul 2017 07:08:30 -0500http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-8164837901.jpgTake a look at significant events from President Donald Trump's time in office, including the signing of the travel ban, Neil Gorsuch's appointment to the Supreme Court, the launch of 59 missiles at Syria's government-held Shayrat Airfiled and more.

Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images]]>