Woman Accused of Fake Silicone Injections

By Omar Villafranca
|  Thursday, Nov 14, 2013  |  Updated 9:24 AM CDT
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A police report obtained by NBC 5 said that two people ended up in the hospital after a Dallas transgender beauty queen injected them with silicone in their thighs and buttocks at a house.

Omar villafranca, NBC 5 News

A police report obtained by NBC 5 said that two people ended up in the hospital after a Dallas transgender beauty queen injected them with silicone in their thighs and buttocks at a house.

Police in Louisiana are looking for a Dallas woman suspected of administering fake silicone injections.

New Orleans Police Officer Frank Robertson III said there is a warrant for Armani Nicole Davenport, a transgender beauty queen, for one count of negligent injury.

A police report obtained by NBC 5 said that two people ended up in the hospital after Davenport injected them with silicone in their thighs and buttocks at a house.

One of the women is in critical condition in a New Orleans hospital.

Davenport did not answer request for comment made through social media.

Dr. Glenn Hardesty, of Texas Health Arlington, works in the emergency room and has seen patients come in after bad shots.

Hardesty said the danger is that if patients don't get silicone shots from a licensed doctor, they don't know what is being pumped into their body.

It could be "anything from bath caulk to something they concocted in their own bathroom," Hardesty said.

Hardesty said he's seen patients in the ER who were injected with silicone purchased at a hardware store. The product was made for sealing bathroom tiles, not medical use.

"The use of nonmedical grade anything to inject anywhere is very dangerous for the patient," he said. "You don't even know what you're getting."

Many people think they're getting a good deal with an "at-home" silicone injection because medical-grade silicone vials run several hundred dollars and take several visits to achieve the look a patient wants.

"This costs three to four hundred dollars," Hardesty said while holding vials of medical grade silicone.

"This costs $6.99 at Home Depot," Hardesty said while holding a tube of silicone bathroom caulk.

The doctor said both products may have silicone in them, but they have very different purposes. Hardesty said the results of injections from bad silicone can range from sickness, dead skin, inflammation, embolisms and even death.

For patients looking to improve appearances on the cheap, a bad dose of fake silicone can ruin their appearance.

"It can make them very deformed," Hardesty said. "It can be a very catastrophic, disfiguring event."

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