What Memorial Day Means to North Texans

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    It was a very special Memorial Day for many North Texans.

    Memorial Day means so much to so many people in Dallas-Fort Worth.

    For Melissa Zuniga of Fort Worth, Memorial Day meant a trip to the Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery with her four daughters to visit the gravesite of her father, Candelario Zuniga, who fought in the Vietnam War as a member of the United States Army.

    "We just come to remember him, really. And all these people," Zuniga said, referring to the other men and women veterans buried at the cemetery. "So [my children] know, I guess, all these people are here for a reason."

    Memorial Day meant a change of plans for the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, and the crowd of people who hoped to watch the orchestra perform a free concert in Dallas' Flag Pole Hill Park Monday night, to be followed by a fireworks display.

    The threat of rain forced the orchestra to relocate the show to its regular home at the Meyerson Symphony Center in the Arts District, and to cancel the fireworks display.

    Despite the change in plans, the symphony still played a selection of patriotic music to a nearly-packed house.

    For veteran Dr. Buddy Cohen, Memorial Day is an opportunity to reflect.

    "I think it's a good thing to have Memorial Day," Cohen said.

    Cohen, a resident of The Legacy at Willow Bend senior living community in Plano, is a veteran of World War II where he served as a dentist in the 339th Infantry Regiment of the 5th Army's 85th Division in Europe.

    Cohen said his hope for how others spend their Memorial Day is to take a moment and remember those who gave their lives in service to this country.

    "I hope they think about a lot of good men [who] went to war and lot of good men didn't come back," Cohen said.