West Plano Intersection Under Scrutiny

By Catherine Ross
|  Friday, Apr 18, 2014  |  Updated 5:42 AM CDT
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The City of Plano is taking a closer look at the intersection of Ohio Drive and Quincy Lane, after residents complain of too many accidents and destruction of property at the corner.

Catherine Ross, NBC 5 Collin County Reporter

The City of Plano is taking a closer look at the intersection of Ohio Drive and Quincy Lane, after residents complain of too many accidents and destruction of property at the corner.

An intersection West Plano residents describe as "dangerous" is under city scrutiny.

Nancy and Victor Rattananinad said over the past five years, since roads were widened in their neighborhood, they've seen a consistent problem with crashes at Ohio Drive and Quincy Lane.

"Within the past five years, it's four times," said Nancy Rattananinad, counting how many times her property has been damaged.

The Rattananinads have had their fence and mailbox hit, as well as seen the brickwork in front of their home destroyed twice.

Cars have landed mere feet from their living room window.

"That is my concern — that it is so dangerous," she said. "Being around this area, we may get hurt — even killed."

City engineering and traffic leadership met Thursday, as part of a series of efforts to make the intersection more safe.

"We can't figure out why they’re not yielding to the approaching traffic," said Lloyd Neal, Plano's transportation engineering manager. "We just haven't found out the clean solution. We've tried increasing the size of stop sign signs, we've tried increasing the reflectivity of those signs, we've added the sub-plate 'cross traffic does not stop.'"

Neal said statistically, comparing how many crashes occur to the relatively low traffic flow in that area, it makes the intersection one of the city's most dangerous.

He added they think the idea of creating a four-way stop, by adding stop signs to Ohio Drive, would frustrate drivers by disrupting the majority of the traffic flow.

A traffic light, he adds, would make that problem worse.

By summer, however, the city is considering adding more signage to the median of the road, encouraging east-west drivers to yield.

Some of the signage may include flashing lights, an attempt to make drivers pay attention.

In the meantime, Rattananinad family told NBC 5 they fear in the time the city debates a solution, something devastating could happen in their front yard.

So far, they report a total of $5,000 in property damage over five years due to vehicle crashes ending up in their yard.

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