Tuskegee Airmen Exhibit Upgraded In Dallas

The African-American aviators broke color barriers in the U.S. military

Saturday, Nov 10, 2012  |  Updated 10:37 AM CDT
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Starting Sunday, the Frontiers of Flight Museum at Love Field expands its exhibit honoring African-American World War II pilots. Museum director Bruce Bleakley and wife of a Tuskegee Airman Erma Platte discuss the exhibit.

NBC 5 News

Starting Sunday, the Frontiers of Flight Museum at Love Field expands its exhibit honoring African-American World War II pilots. Museum director Bruce Bleakley and wife of a Tuskegee Airman Erma Platte discuss the exhibit.

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On Sunday, members of the Tuskegee Airmen living in North Texas will gather together once again. They'll help open the Frontier's of Flight Museum expanded exhibit that honors their heroism.

Before 1940, African-Americans were barred from flying for the U.S. military. But in 1941, the first all-black aviation training began in Tuskegee, Alabama. They later flew on missions in Europe. In January of 2012, their stories were profiled in the George Lucas' film Red Tails.

According to the museum's website, the expanded exhibition will include some of the Airmen's personal collections. There are also electronic, interactive displays of the airmen's bases and history.

Several of the original Tuskegee Airmen who live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area will attend a celebration at the museum on Sunday, November 11, 2012. The expanded exhibition opens to the public on Monday.

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