Texas Connects Us: Artist Creates Beauty To Inspire Acceptance - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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Texas Connects Us: Artist Creates Beauty To Inspire Acceptance

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    Artist Michael Sutton is working to help people find beauty in all things, one art piece at a time. (Published Wednesday, March 8, 2017)

    Artist Michael Sutton is working to help people find beauty in all things, one art piece at a time.

    "That's probably my most loved piece I've ever made," Sutton said, about a piece hanging at restaurant Malai Kitchen in Southlake.

    He creates his art work in his studio in Deep Ellum.

    "This is almost the beginning process," Sutton said at his drawing table.

    He starts simple: with a sketch book and a pencil.

    "I know a lot of artists, and every one approaches art in a totally different way. Their processes are different," Sutton said.

    For him, he sees a universe-sized idea in his mind, but makes an itty-bitty sketch.

    "I've tried doing these bigger, and actually even drawing them from the beginning full size. I just can't do it. I don't know why," Sutton said.

    Guiding each step are tiny lines foretelling what's next.

    "Cutting in with sand blasting, carving into it," Sutton said while working.

    He's creating balance, composition and variety.

    "The same things that all visual art are about," Sutton said.

    But he also includes what most art does not. He said he uses elements usually associated with decay.

    "Things that you might think would make something ugly, but then I like to use those things to make it beautiful," Sutton said.

    One hanging in his studio had seeping holes that he said represent wounds.

    "Some of the hardships and the bad things you go through that really wound you also make you the beautiful person that people see," Sutton said.

    And helping other people see that unique beauty in one another is a major goal of his work.

    "In everyday life, maybe the person is a little more likely to be receptive to something that's different or somebody that's different," Sutton said. "What I hope the most, I guess, is that my work will help in the transformation of a person into somebody more loving, more receptive, tolerant."

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