Small Plane Crashes Near Hebron High School

Three on board a small plane that crashed in Carrollton

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    NEWSLETTERS

    An investigation is underway after a plane crashes near Hebron High School.

    A small, single-engine airplane crashed near Hebron High School in Carrollton Monday morning, killing a man and injuring two people.

    The plane crashed at about 11:30 a.m. in a field adjacent to some railroad tracks shortly after departing the Addison airport.

    Carrollton police identified the man killed in the crash as Richard Goodrum, 47, of Flower Mound.

    One Dead in Carrollton Plane Crash

    [DFW] One Dead in Carrollton Plane Crash
    An investigation is underway after a plane crashes near Hebron High School.

    Leah Yeager, of the National Transportation and Safety Board, said the pilot reported engine trouble and asked to return to the airport.

    On approach, the Cirrus SR22T crashed in a field.

    "He just reported that he was having engine problems," Yeager said. "According to one of the witnesses that we talked to, she mentioned that she heard it, the engine, basically, stopping, then revving back up, then stopping again and then just completely no power."

    Three people were on board the aircraft at the time of the crash. Goodrum, a passenger riding in the back seat of the aircraft, was killed. The pilot and the second passenger, who was in the front, survived.

    Both survivors were hospitalized, and their conditions are not known.

    Emerus, a company that owns and operates 24-hour emergency rooms in McKinney and Aubrey, released the following statement about the crash:

    "This morning, a plane carrying three of our employees crashed in the Dallas area. This is a tremendously difficult day for our company. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family members of those affected, and we ask that their privacy be respected." -- COO David Stillwell, Emerus

    The aircraft, which was built in 2010, was equipped with a parachute that would help it survive a crash. According to the NTSB, that parachute was not fully deployed at the time of impact.