Reward Offered After Historic Cemetery Vandalized in Princeton

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Princeton police are offering a $500 cash reward for tips that'll help catch the people responsible for a rash of vandalism at the city's cemetery. About 50 headstones, markers and urns were damaged or destroyed over the weekend, some dating back to the 1800s.

    Princeton police are offering a $500 cash reward for tips that'll help catch the people responsible for a rash of vandalism at the city's cemetery this weekend.

    About 50 headstones, markers and urns were damaged or destroyed over the weekend, some dating back to the 1800s.

    The treasurer of the Princeton Cemetery Association board said insurance will not cover the damage.

    Reward Offered After Historic Cemetery Vandalized

    [DFW] Reward Offered After Historic Cemetery Vandalized
    Princeton police are offering a $500 cash reward for tips that'll help catch the people responsible for a rash of vandalism at the city's cemetery this weekend.

    About two dozen volunteers from Princeton gathered together at the cemetery Monday morning to roll up their sleeves and repair the grave sites.

    "That's what a community is about. We're here to help one another," said Police Chief James Waters.

    Waters called the crime shocking and deplorable.

    In total, 45 headstones were knocked over, chipping many of them and breaking some in half.

    Several urns and family mementos were also smashed and destroyed.

    "You can tell by looking around this community, it has devastated this community," Waters said.

    Margaret Cantu was one of the first volunteers to arrive at the cemetery Monday morning. Her son's tombstone was knocked over and damaged.

    "I want them to be caught. To have to pay restitution. To have to put flowers on these graves," she said, choking back heavy tears as she cleaned the grave.

    Cantu's son Marc died 14 years ago. He left behind three children. She said the vandals didn't just damage the grave, but they also broke the family's hearts.

    "I'd like to know if it was your parents, if it was your family, how would you feel? How would you feel?" she said.

    Waters believes "at least two or three people" committed the crimes, because the tombstones are very heavy and would likely require several people to knock down.

    He said several police officers and firefighters have pitched in to fund the reward. The reward might get even bigger in the days ahead, Waters said.

    Because police believe a large group of people came to the cemetery, they are hopeful that a friend or family member will come forward with information.