Residents Want to Zap Taser Memorial

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBCDFW.com
    The memorial was created after the 2009 death of 24-year-old Michael Jacobs Jr., who died after a Fort Worth police officer shocked him with a stun gun for close to one minute.

    Some Highland Hills residents are calling for the removal of the National Taser Memorial in Fort Worth.

    The memorial has more than 450 crosses in a yard next to the New Mount Cavalry Baptist Church. A fake gravestone bearing the name Michael Jacobs sits on the right side of the memorial.

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    Each cross represents someone who was killed by stun-gun related violence.

    But nearby residents say the memorial looks more like a cemetery.

    "If you're going to make a memorial for someone, put a small memorial, not that large, 400 or more crosses," Eunice Givens said. "Some of the neighbors think it looks like the National Cemetery. It's so huge, so it needs to be moved."

    The memorial was created after the 2009 death of 24-year-old Michael Jacobs Jr., who died after a Fort Worth police officer shocked him with a stun gun for close to one minute and then again for several seconds.

    Givens said the memorial should be placed elsewhere because Jacobs' death didn't happen in the neighborhood. She said she is tired of having to explain what the memorial is to visitors.

    But other residents say the memorial is no worse than the unkempt lot across from the church.

    William Johnson, a member of the neighborhood association, said he appreciates what the memorial stands for. He said he doesn't understand opposition to it and thinks the memorial should stay.

    Rev. Kyev Tatum said the entire field could be filled with more crosses if police departments don't stop using stun guns.

    Because the memorial sits on a lot owned by the New Mount Cavalry Baptist Church and does not violate any codes, the city of Fort Worth cannot remove it.