Neighbors: Rental House Now Noisy "Frat House"

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    Corinth residents say rowdy fraternity parties are ruining their neighborhood.

    Residents of a Denton County neighborhood say a group of fraternity brothers who attend the University of North Texas are ruining their once-peaceful area.

    By day, children ride bikes and skateboards along the sidewalks of the Forest Hill subdivision in Corinth. But by night, dozens of college students show up almost every weekend for all-night parties at the house on Wavery Road that is now informally known as "the frat house."

    "Since those kids, the college kids, moved in, there has been quite a bit of increase traffic, quite of bit of speeding through the neighborhood and quite a bit of drinking," said Roger Doddy, who lives two houses down. "That’s been evidenced by beer cans and trash and whatnot from late-night parties."

    Neighborhood Says Frat is Taking Over

    [DFW] Neighborhood Says Frat is Taking Over
    Residents in one North Texas neighborhood say a fraternity from the University of North Texas has changed their quiet street.

    Neighbors say its difficult to get into their homes when their cul-de-sac is packed with cars and when more cars line both sides of the road. Many times, residents can't get their mail because visiting cars are blocking their mailboxes.

    "When you get that traffic from individuals who are speeding and quite possible drinking, then children or anyone who is out on the streets could be at risk," Doddy said.

    Corinth police said they rarely, if ever, visited the street before the group of six Sigma Nu fraternity brothers moved in.

    "We’ve responded to that location about 18 to 20 times," Capt. Greg Wilkerson said. "There were various complaints about noise ordinance violations, parties with possible underage drinking and things of that nature."

    Police reports show neighbors have complained about students urinating and/or vomiting in their yards, leaving trash behind after parties and the lack of parking.

    Several residents have approached the City Council with their concerns. Since then, the city has been looking into the possibility of an ordinance that would limit the number of unrelated people that can share a house, said Mayor Paul Ruggeire.

    City attorneys are investigating the legality of such an ordinance.

    In the meantime, police have stepped up patrols along the street.

    But one neighbor, Steve Reid, isn't waiting for a solution. He's selling his house to get away from the group of fraternity brothers that he says keep him and family up all night.