Complete and continuing coverage of the fatal shootings at Fort Hood on Nov. 5, 2009

Killeen Residents Turn to Faith in Wake of Shootings

Residents pack local churches on Sunday

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    KILLEEN, TX - NOVEMBER 08: Mark Rodgers shows his support near the front gate to Fort Hood on November 8, 2009 in Killeen, Texas. U.S. Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan, an army psychiatrist, killed 13 people and wounded 30 in a shooting rampage at the Soldier Readiness Center on the grounds of the Texas military base Fort Hood on November 5. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

    Killeen residents packed local churches Sunday morning hoping faith will help their community through what has been a very tragic week. 

    At Memorial Baptist church, not far from Fort Hood, the pastor offered a message of healing and hope.

    Killeen Residents Look to Church for Healing

    [DFW] Killeen Residents Look to Church for Healing
    Killeen residents turn to their faith for healing after the worst mass shooting on an Army post in history. (Published Sunday, Nov 8, 2009)

    "We will never forget this Thursday in November 2009, but like 9/11, like Pearl Harbor, like the Challenger accident, we move forward.  We move on."

    Members of the congregation were noticeably upset-- some in tears with heavy hearts.

    "Some of us were just so sad that we couldn't verbalize what was going on and how we felt inside," said Killeen resident, Vivian Daveau.

    Mark Rodgers, a Texas veteran,  lives two hours away from Killeen, but drove all that way to park his pick up truck on the side of Highway 190 near Fort Hood.  On the back of his truck was a homemade sign that read "Praying for you."  He stood by his truck for hours on Sunday holding an American flag, praying for the soldiers stationed at Fort Hood.

    "Yeah I guess I could be doing other things, but this is something I'll never forget for the rest of my life," said Rodgers.

    Passersby honked their horns and several soldiers repeatedly stopped by his prayer memorial to thank him for his support.

    "The most influential people that have stopped have been soldiers that have stopped to tell me thanks, and I'm the one that should be thanking them," said Rodgers.