2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

Complete coverage of the 2012 election

Voters Question "I Voted" Sticker Shortage

Collin County says it has thousands of stickers at polling locations

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A Frisco man says he is upset that he didn't receive an "I voted" sticker after casting his ballot. Collin County said 200,000 stickers are out at its polling locations. (Published Tuesday, Nov 6, 2012)

    A Frisco man says he was denied one of his favorite parts of Election Day – the “I voted” sticker.

    “Every year when I get to vote, when I turn in my ballot, I was always handed an ‘I voted’ sticker,” said Crazy Eagle, a regular voter and Patriot Guard rider. “I always felt proud to wear that on my chest and I’d wear that all day.”

    But this year, after casting his ballot at the Frisco Collin College polling location, Eagle said he was outraged.

    “I turned in my ballot and asked for an ‘I voted’ sticker and they said Collin County doesn’t have them,” he says.

    Eagle says he called Collin County offices to complain, and maintains he was told the county opted not to spend money on the stickers for the 2012 election.

    “I can’t believe Collin County cannot afford to spend the money to show the residents they appreciate that they voted,” he said.

    However, NBC5 also spoke with Collin County Elections officials.

    Elections administrator Sharon Rowe said the county had 200,000 stickers in the field at various locations.

    In Plano, voter Gary Bodiford walked out of voting with the in-demand sticker, but said he had to ask the poll workers to “dig around a bit” to find one for him to wear.

    Whether it was an issue of under-preparation or a deliberate choice, Eagle says the lack of a sticker doesn’t cheapen his vote, but simply gives him one less way to show off his pride for participating in the political process.