German Company To Inspect Coaster Where Woman Fell

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Gerstlauer Amusement Rides, plans to send its own people to figure out what went wrong on rollercoaster, Friday night. (Published Sunday, Jul 21, 2013)

    The Germany based maker of the Texas Giant, Gerstlauer Amusement Rides, plans to send its own people to figure out what went wrong on rollercoaster, Friday night.

    Tobias Lindnar, a project manager for Gerstlauer Amusement Rides in Munsterhausen, Germany, told The Dallas Morning News that the company will investigate what led to Friday's fatal accident at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington.

    Neighbors Describe Coaster Fall Victim

    [DFW] Neighbors Describe Coaster Fall Victim
    Family members identify Rosy Esparza of Dallas as the woman who fell from a roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington. (Published Monday, Jul 22, 2013)

    Family members identified Rosy Esparza as the woman who died at Six Flags Over Texas on Friday evening. The Arlington theme park confirmed that a woman died while riding the Texas Giant roller coaster on Friday evening.

    Witnesses said Esparza expressed concern about the Texas Giant roller coaster's safety bar not completely engaging as the ride was starting. The coaster is touted as the tallest steel-hybrid roller coaster in the world.

    Woman Dies Riding Roller Coaster at Six Flags

    [DFW] Woman Dies Riding Roller Coaster at Six Flags
    Six Flags confirmed that a woman died while riding the Texas Giant roller coaster. (Published Friday, Jul 19, 2013)

    "I'm sure there's no safety bar that is broken," Lindnar told the newspaper by phone Saturday night from Germany.

    Lindnar said Gerstlauer has never had problems with car safety bars on any of the roughly 50 roller coasters it's built around the world over the past 30 years.

    "We will be on site and we will see what has happened," he said.

    Ken Martin, an amusement ride safety inspector says it may not be enough.

    Texas is one of 21 states that does not have an agency to investigate park accidents and deaths.

    “Texas is loosely regulated, some would say not regulated at all,” Martin told NBC DFW.

    Martin said the company and the park will have to look at whether or not the restraint worked, in keeping Esparza in her seat.

    “It’s supposed to sit firmly against the rider, and hold you know, their body in the car, and of course that didn't happen,” Martin said.

    The family, through facebook, has said Rosy Esparza was an adventurous and loving mother. Her husband and children are now in the process of figuring out funeral plans.