Garland City Council to Consider Salvia Ban

Proposed ordinance would ban sale, distribution of salvia A, salvia divinorum

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Garland may soon be the latest city to pass an ordinance that bans the sale of the natural hallucinogenic plant salvia. (Published Monday, Mar 12, 2012)

    Garland may join the list of North Texas cities to ban salvia.

    Officials have drafted an ordinance that would ban the sale and distribution of of salvia A and salvia divinorum.

    Garland May Ban the Sale of Salvia

    [DFW] Garland May Ban the Sale of Salvia
    Garland may soon be the latest city to pass an ordinance that bans the sale of the natural hallucinogenic plant salvia. (Published Monday, Mar 12, 2012)

    Garland police said the use of salvia is getting more popular around the state and country. Police said that while it is legal, salvia can cause powerful hallucinations.

    "We are concerned that the ease of access and that this a plant -- a natural plant that does mimic chemically manufactured LSD -- we want to do our best that our citizens are safe," Officer Mike Hatfield said.

    The City Council will vote on the ordinance during the last week in March. Police officials hope to have it in effect by April 1 if it passes.

    If the measure passes, police will target smoke shops or stores that could make it easy to buy salvia.

    "Because we're targeting the possession with intent to sell in Garland, it will be considered a Class C offense in the state of Texas and could be punishable up to $500 dollars in fines," Hatfield said.

    Garland resident Julie Clayton, who is in recovery from using prescription drugs said she supports the proposed ordinance.

    "It's important the city and parents are paying attention to what our children are getting a hold of and what it's doing to them," she said.

    Edward Soto, a Garland parent, said he hopes an ordinance would actually deter people from using the plant.

    "There are already problems with the high schoolers, and I don't think they need another one so if they ban it altogether it would help," he said.