Flu Shots Quickly Disappearing In DFW

Flu remains widespread in Texas

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Emergency rooms in Dallas, El Paso and elsewhere remain crowded with flu patients. (Published Sunday, Jan 13, 2013)

    The flu remains widespread in Texas, and people are still taking precautions and rushing to get the flu shot.

    Many pharmacies ran out of flu shots this weekend as a steady stream of people came in for them. And now urgent care centers are reporting record numbers of patients suffering flu symptoms.

    Flu Remains Widespread In Texas

    [DFW] Flu Remains Widespread In Texas
    Emergency rooms in Dallas, El Paso and elsewhere remain crowded with flu patients. (Published Saturday, Jan 12, 2013)

    The care center at JPS Hospital in Fort Worth expects to break those records tomorrow after many people spent a cold day indoors.

    So many people got to the Care Now clinic on McCart in Fort Worth before it closed, the doctors and nurses stayed late to help them.

    Boy, 6, First Pediatric Flu Death

    [DFW] Boy, 6, First Pediatric Flu Death
    6-year-old Adam Lucero died in November, Dallas County Health Department says his is the first pediatric flu death of the season. (Published Friday, Jan 11, 2013)

    Glena Herrington found the door already locked when she showed up to help her son, sick with the flu.  She is now wearing a face mask.

    “I just bought it, I just bought it and put it on," Herrington said. "It’s not comfortable but anything for protection." 

    Long Lines for Flu Shots in Arlington

    [DFW] Long Lines for Flu Shots in Arlington
    The lines are long and the waiting rooms are full at clinics, doctors' offices and pharmacies as people rush to get vaccinated against the flu. (Published Friday, Jan 11, 2013)

    The cold and flu aisles in drug stores and pharmacies are also picked over. But many expect shipments of flu vaccine and medicine early next week.

    Catholic churches in 29 West Texas counties have been told to stop using shared communion cups. 

    Teachers in some East Texas schools are cleaning desks, water fountains and doorknobs.

    The flu season usually starts in October and peaks from December through February. But this season started a bit earlier -- in September.

    Dr. Jeffrey Kahn is infectious diseases director at Children's Medical Center in Dallas. He says flu's unpredictable and it's unclear how much longer the season will last. 

    NBC 5's Kevin Cokely contributed to this story.