First of Two North Texas Bald Eagle Eggs Has Hatched - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

First of Two North Texas Bald Eagle Eggs Has Hatched

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    Two American bald eagles in Seagoville have welcomed the first of their two offspring. (Published Thursday, March 2, 2017)

    Two American bald eagles in Seagoville have welcomed the first of their two offspring.

    The camera at the John Bunker Sands Wetland Center showed the first of two eggs hatched on Thursday. The eaglet, called JBC8 could be seen moving in the nest as the bald eagle repositioned itself.

    You can watch the live stream of the eagles, CLICK HERE to visit the John Bunker Sands Wetland Center website.

    The center said the first egg was laid on January 25, the second on January 28.

    John DeFillipo says the eagles are quite draw for visitors to the 2,000 acre Kaufman County conservation center.

    "I think it's a wonderful window into wildlife observation," DeFillipo said. "I call them arm chair conservationists."

    You may remember when the eagles built their nest on a transmission tower that was dangerously close to high-voltage electricity. So crews built a replica tower and moved the nest 1,200 feet from the power lines. 

    Now people around the world can watch the eagles movements on a 24-hour webcam.

    You can watch the live stream of the eagles, CLICK HERE to visit the John Bunker Sands Wetland Center website.

    The cameras caught their return to North Texas in the fall.

    Now anticipation is mounting for the second eaglet's arrival. It'll be called JBS9.

    "Once they hatch, and they are nest-bound, we call them eaglets and once they fledge, once they take that first flight then they're juveniles," DeFillipo said. "I call them juvys for short, because it looks like they're in jail sometimes."

    This is not their first egg since moving, NBC 5 reported when an eaglet was seen five months after the move.

    The center believes this pair of bald eagles helps the population in North Texas increase.

    Their offspring may very well be the eagles often spotted in the area along the Elm Fork of the Trinity River in Irving, or near the Lake Lewisville Dam or the pair who've made their home north of Lake Ray Roberts.

    The hope of many watching is that the latest offspring also return to call North Texas home.

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