Family Remembers Slain Good Samaritan

Arlington honors man shot and killed while trying to help toddlers out of car wreck

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The City of Arlington will honor Clarence Robinson, the Good Samaritan who was shot and killed in the aftermath of a deadly multi-vehicle crash at Brown Boulevard and Collins Street.

    The family of a Good Samaritan recognized by the city of Arlington for his heroic actions says he was always a hero to them.

    Clarence "C.J." Robinson, 18, was shot and killed in December while trying to help two toddlers involved in a deadly wreck. The man who allegedly shot Robinson is accused of causing two car crashes before opening fire at the scene of the second wreck while his two children were in the backseat.

    On Tuesday, the City Council honored him with city and state proclamations recognizing his selfless actions.

    His family attended the meeting, where his mother, Sharon Robinson, was presented with the proclamations.

    Good Samaritan Honored in Arlington

    [DFW] Good Samaritan Honored in Arlington
    The City of Arlington will honor Clarence Robinson, the Good Samaritan who was shot and killed in the aftermath of a deadly multi-vehicle crash at Brown Boulevard and Collins Street.

    Clarence Robinson's family remembers him as an always upbeat 18-year-old who put others first.

    "He would come in the house and make me smile and make me laugh when he knew I was feeling down," said Sharon Robinson.

    She said she still talked to her son every day after she moved Arlington to Louisiana several years ago -- except on the day of his death.

    Family members said they tried all day to get a hold of him.

    "I tried calling his cellphone like 15 times," said his sister, Jammie Pinion.

    Then, his family received the news.

    "When they called me back and told me what happened, it took everything out of me because he always was my hero," Sharon Robinson said.

    Family members said they were shocked and devastated to learn he was killed, but were not surprised to hear he was trying to help.

    "That is him. He always wanted to be helpful and do whatever he can," said his grandmother, Carrie Skinner.

    "It's hard, because I know that I'll never see him again on Earth," said Pinion. "But he's still with us; his spirit is still with us."

    "That was my only son," Sharon Robinson said. "I won't get another one. I just have to look forward to seeing him again."