NTX Muslim, Christian, Jewish Leaders Denounce Post-Election Division | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

NTX Muslim, Christian, Jewish Leaders Denounce Post-Election Division

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    NEWSLETTERS

    (Published Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016)

    Several religious leaders from across North Texas publicly denounced the post-election targeting of Muslims, undocumented people and minorities at a rally Tuesday.

    Faith in Texas, a multi-faith group based in DFW, organized the event at the Islamic Center of North Texas in Richardson. People from various faiths prayed together before and afterward. 

    Several leaders from the Muslim, Jewish and Christian communities called for people to unite after the divisiveness they have seen three weeks after the election. 

    "The fear is that bigotry has now been normalized," said Imam Omar Suleiman of Valley Ranch Mosque. "It’s important that the policy does not become discriminatory. That bigotry does not translate into legalized discrimination." 

    Faith in Texas Rally Tuesday

    [DFW]  Faith in Texas Rally Tuesday
    Several religious officials will publicly denounce the post-election targeting of Muslims, undocumented people and minorities at a rally Tuesday.
    (Published Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016)

    But there have also been signs of support, Suleiman said, particularly at his mosque. The day after the election, they were pleasantly surprised to see people holding posters that read, "Resist Islamophobia."

    "It automatically defeats the idea that America is all doom and gloom," Suleiman added.

    For Maria Robles, a mother of four, there is hope -- and there is fear. 

    "Uncertainty and fear," Robles said.

    Robles' husband is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, living in the United States for 22 years. Since the election, she said her 11-year-old daughter's daily fear is that their family will be torn apart. 

    "It's heartbreaking," Robles said. "Seeing her pull out her suitcase and say she doesn’t want to live in another country, but she doesn’t want to live without her dad."

    But Robles said seeing people from various races and religions united gives her hope.

    Faith in Texas is holding a policy summit on Saturday, Dec. 3 at the Greater Bethlehem Baptist Church from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    Anyone is welcome and they will discuss proposed immigration, education and criminal justice reform in the Texas legislation.

    Online:www.faithintx.org | www.livefreeusa.org