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Dry Conditions Lead to Aggressive Mosquitoes

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Researchers at UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth say mosquitoes are evolving to stand a better chance during dry conditions plaguing North Texas. (Published Friday, Jun 6, 2014)

    Researchers at UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth say mosquites are evolving to stand a better chance during dry conditions plaguing North Texas.

    Dr. Joon Lee is a medical entomologist at UNT Health Science Center and is part of a program tracking mosquitoes and West Nile virus trends.

    "The number may be down or low than other years, however the mosquitos are actually more active more strongm,” Lee said.

    This season’s mosquitos are living longer and are biting more aggressively, so slather on the deet, Lee said.

    Parents like Chelsea Bohrer of Arlington aren’t even sure the best repellant is enough to do the job,

    “They seem to be more aggressive," Bohrer said. "My neighbor and I joke that they've mutated cause nothing that we put on the babes seems to be working.” 


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