Continuing coverage of the Fort Worth doctor who contracted Ebola while working in Liberia

Dr. Kent Brantly Says He's Recovering in Every Way, Hopes to be Discharged Soon

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, are seen in an undated photo provided by Samaritan's Purse. Brantly became the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa, arriving at at Emory University Hospital, in Atlanta on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Fellow aid worker Nancy Writebol, who has been recently diagnosed with Ebola, is expected to arrive in Atlanta on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)

    Dr. Kent Brantly, the Fort Worth doctor who contracted Ebola doing aid work in West Africa, released a statement from his isolated Atlanta hospital room and says he's recovering in every way and looking forward to being reunited with his wife and family.

    Brantly, who was volunteering with the charity Samaritan's Purse in Liberia amid the worst-ever outbreak of the deadly virus, has been improving steadily after being treated with an experimental drug earlier this month.

    Brantly remained hospitalized Friday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. His comments came in a statement issued through the charity.

    In the statement, Brantly expresses gratitude for the health care professionals who are treating him with "compassionate, world-class care," adding he is "more grateful every day to the Lord for sparing my life."

    Brantly and a second American, Nancy Writebol, were flown out of Liberia earlier this month and are being treated in an isolation unit at the Atlanta hospital. The two were infected while working at a missionary clinic outside Liberia's capital.

    On Friday, Aug. 15, Brantly released the following statement:

    As my treatment continues in the isolation unit at Emory University Hospital, I am recovering in every way. I thank God for the healthcare team here who is giving me compassionate, world-class care. I am more grateful every day to the Lord for sparing my life and continuing to heal my body. There are still a few hurdles to clear before I can be discharged, but I hold on to the hope of a sweet reunion with my wife, children and family in the near future.

     

    Thank you for your prayers for Nancy and me. Please continue to pray for and bring attention to those suffering in the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa. Their fight is far from over.

     

    With deep gratitude,

     

    Kent Brantly

    In a statement released last Friday, Brantly thanked God for his mercy while discussing the horrors he witnessed in Africa.

    Fund Established to Help Brantly Family

    The JPS Foundation is now accepting donations for Brantly and his family, who lost all of their earthly possessions when he contracted the Ebola virus and was returned to the United States for treatment.  After his symptoms appeared, Brantly was isolated and was never able to return to their home. According to JPS, everything is considered contaminated by Ebola and will be destroyed.

    "No date has been announced for his release from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but when he is well enough to join his family, they will face the challenge of replacing everything from household items and clothing to computers and children’s toys," said JPS in a statement Friday. "All funds will be held in a separate account within the JPS Foundation for the financial support of Dr. Brantly and his family during his recovery.

    Anyone who would like to contribute can do so at www.givetojps.org. A drop-down menu allows donations to be earmarked for Dr. Brantly.

    Contributions, which are tax-deductible, also can be mailed to:

    JPS Foundation
    Kent Brantly Fund
    1223 S. Main St.
    Fort Worth, TX 76104