Dallas Completes Investigation of Complaints City Workers Wasted Taxpayer Time

YouTube video documented workers in a creek bed from May 1 through May 7

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    NEWSLETTERS

    YouTube
    Mark Bushkuhl posted a video on YouTube called "City of Dallas Workers and Your Wasted Tax Dollars." Bushkuhl says his video documents city workers standing, sitting and laying down on the job.

    The city of Dallas said it has completed its investigation of city employees shown taking multiple breaks in a YouTube video posted by a resident back in May.

    Mark Buskuhl said the footage in his video, "City of Dallas Workers and Your Wasted Tax Dollars," showed city workers standing, sitting and lying down on the job when they were supposed to be clearing out trees from a creek bed on city property behind office buildings in the 8800-block of Greenville Avenue.

    City of Dallas spokesman Frank Librio said after a thorough review of the facts, as well as the home video and employee and citizen interviews, the city disciplined several workers.

    City Hall Investigates City Worker Video

    [DFW] City Hall Investigates City Worker Video
    Dallas said it's investigating city employees shown taking multiple breaks in a YouTube video posted by Mark Buskuhl.

    Three employees received warning letters and six employees received written reprimands, which go in their personnel file.

    One employee failed on promotional probation, which means the person was promoted in a civil service position, failed during the six-month probationary period, and went back to their old position.

    One employee was suspended and another retired after the incident.

    In the video narrative, Buskuhl said the workers spent "about five minutes each hour actually doing work with a chainsaw and a Bobcat" to clear the trees.

    In May, the city reported that five trees and 31 tons of debris were removed from the job site on May 1-3 and May 7 and that work was restricted to 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and staff break times during the workday were 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m.

    NBC 5's Ken Kalthoff contributed to this report.