Angling for Trout

Texas Parks and Wildlife gives free pass to license-less anglers

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AFP/Getty Images
    Trout farmer Jorge Jordan shows a young rainbow trout with ulcers on its tale, at his trout farm near the town of Los Cipreses, in the Argentine Patagonia, some 2100 km southwest of Buenos Aires, on May 9, 2008. The farm's pools are mixed with ash from Chile's Chaiten volcano, which yestarday burst into a phase of higher activity spewing out clouds of ash, forcing the last stragglers who had refused to evacuate from its base to leave. AFP PHOTO/JUAN MABROMATA (Photo credit should read JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images)

    Fishermen, and women … fisherpersons out to score some scaly goodness but lack a proper license don’t have to skulk around in the shadows tomorrow.

    Texas Parks and Wildlife grants a kind of angling clemency Dec. 1 at the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center just outside Athens, Texas, when the agency stocks the ponds with rainbow trout. A fishing license is not necessary to join in the fishing fun, and, in fact, they’ll even provide the equipment and bait.

    Anglers will need to pay $5, though, and the catch will be limited to five fish. Still, at $1 a head that’s a pretty good bargain.

    There are a few provisos, though, particularly for those folks who bring their own tackle. Only single hooks “with barbs mashed down” will be allowed, and the good people at TP&W suggest baiting those mashed-down hooks with something called Berkeley PowerBait Hatchery Formula Trout Nuggets because it most resembles a trout’s natural diet.

    This appears to be just one step up the degree of difficulty scale from shooting barreled fish. Y’all have fun now, ya hear?

    Bruce Felps owns and operates East Dallas Times, an online community news outlet serving the White Rock Lake area. He’ll let you have his place in line.