NAACP Marches to Rename Arlington's Division Street

Dozens want Division Street renamed for Martin Luther King, Jr.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NAACP members march to Cowboys Stadium to rally for a change in popular Arlington Street. They would like to see Divsion renamed after Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Jr.

    Dozens of supporters marched in Arlington Saturday, to rename one of the city's busiest streets. 

    Members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People want the eight mile stretch of Division Street renamed for slain civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
     
    Sonjia Davis worked on the plan to change the street name, she said Division Street causes Division between north and south Arlington.

    "It's been known to divide the city economically, racially and so we chose that street because it would be most fitting to bring unity to the city," said Davis.

    During the march, supporters of the new street name chanted while holding signs that read "no more division."  Others held banners with the images of the slain civil rights leader.

    Leading the rally, Arlington NAACP Chapter President Silk Littlejohn-Gamble, who spoke to the crowd of nearly a hundred supporters in front of Cowboys Stadium.

    "If we can come together to support this dream [the stadium], why can't we come together to support the dream of ending the division," said Littlejohn-Gamble.

    Though the group was met with some opposition, one protester who did not give the media his name said the businesses would have to foot the bill when it comes to making new signs and printing correspondence of the proposed street name.

    "Would these people have compassion if they impose upon the businesses up and down Division Street, financial burdens to change the name of the street?"

    Eighty percent of the property owners along Division Street will have to sign a petition before it will even be considered by Arlington City Council members.

    City Councilman Robert Rivera, supports the group but said they will need the support of the businesses to succeed in the name change.

    "The NAACP has made a request and the city is making sure that the consensus building is there, in order to create whatever change comes from that consensus," said Rivera.

    But members said they are optimistic, it will happen.