2 More Babies Get Herpes After Ritual Circumcisions: Officials

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Two more infants were diagnosed with herpes in New York this month after undergoing ritual Jewish circumcisions, the Health Department says.

    In both cases, the infant boys were born to mothers with full-term pregnancies and normal deliveries. They were circumcised using the direct oral suction technique practiced by some Orthodox Jews eight days after their birth, and developed lesions on their genitals shortly thereafter, the Health Department said.

    Their conditions Wednesday weren't immediately clear.

    NYC to Require Consent for Oral Suction Ritual

    There have been 16 confirmed cases of herpes since 2000 in newborn boys after circumcisions that likely involved direct oral suction, including three in 2014, according to the Health Department. 

    Two of the infants died and at least two others suffered brain damage.

    During the ancient ritual, the person performing the circumcision attempts to cleanse the wound by sucking blood from the cut and spitting it aside. Authorities say the saliva contact could give the infant herpes, which is harmless in adults but could kill newborns.

    In 2012, the Board of Health voted unanimously to require anyone performing circumcisions that involve oral suction to obtain written consent from a parent or guardian. The consent form delineates the potential health risks outlined by the Health Department. 

    A group of Orthodox rabbis sued in an attempt to block the regulation, but a judge sided with the city.

    The parents have to sign a form acknowledging that the city Health Department advises against the practice because of risks of herpes and other infections.