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Dallas County Confirms 20th 2012 West Nile Virus-Related Death

Victim died in April 2013

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Dallas County health officials said Tuesday that a man in his 70s who contracted West Nile virus during last year's outbreak died last month. (Published Tuesday, May 7, 2013)

    The 2012 West Nile virus-related death toll in Dallas County continues to climb in 2013.

    On Tuesday, Dallas County Health and Human Services confirmed a person in their 70s who lived in the 75214 zip code died in April after being diagnosed in 2012 with the neuroinvasive form of the disease.

    Further information about the victim has not been released because of medical confidentiality and privacy reasons, DCHHS said.

    While DCHHS has confirmed West Nile virus in mosquitoes this season, there have been no new human cases reported.

    Several cities have started testing trapped mosquitoes for West Nile virus in hopes of staying ahead of the virus.

    The cities of Frisco, Mesquite, North Richland Hills, Dallas, McKinney and Garland are already trapping and testing mosquitoes. So far, they no insects have tested positive.

    After two mosquitoes tested positive in Lewisville, the city plans to conduct ground spraying in certain areas Tuesday and Wednesday evening.

    Only one mosquito tested positive for the virus in Flower Mound, but city leaders will also spray the area Tuesday and Wednesday.

    Dallas County health officials are reminding everyone that the best way to avoid exposure to West Nile virus is to practice the four Ds: 

    • Use an EPA-approved insect repellent  such as those containing DEET,
    • Drain any standing water,
    • Dress in protective clothing when outdoors and
    • Take extra care during Dust and Dawn hours.

    NBC 5's Omar Villafranca contributed to this report.


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