North Texans Talk Politics With NBC 5 | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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North Texans Talk Politics With NBC 5
BY Kristin Dickerson

Our tour of opinions started in Grand Prairie, where “Momma C” (also known as Cynthia Lock) forced NBC 5’s Kristin Dickerson to eat a bite of her chocolate pie before agreeing to an interview.

“I love that you force-fed me a bite of your pie,” Dickerson told Lock.

“You like that?” said Lock with a laugh.

The Brass Bean coffee shop does have fantastic pie.

Lock and her friend, Gregory Johnson, explained that they used to date, but now they’re roommates.

It’s a joyful friendship, but when it comes to the presidential election, the tone of their conversations change.

“I’m worried about America, I’m worried about our country,” said Lock. “Because this is a really important decision, and it’s important that everybody vote.”

In the Bishop Arts District, NBC 5 set up a table and chairs to provide an open-platform to just talk.

“Well, come on over, Evan. Have a seat!” said Dickerson to 23-year-old Evan Hunter.

“I think this is probably one of the most important elections,” said Hunter. “I mean everyone is important, but this one especially.”

"I guess the thing that came to my mind is just kindness,” when asked what she thinks our country needs more of.

For Calvin Roberts, he said we need to do less talking and more listening.

“Listening to another person— that creates conversation and creates empathy and understanding,” said Roberts.

While NBC 5 listened, we also heard frustration from Jessica Phillips.

She said she isn’t a fan of either presidential candidate.

“So it’s very frustrating to think that potentially the next four or eight years of my life are going to be run by either one of these two people,” Phillips said.

In Fort Worth at Paris coffee shop, we learned from Larry behind the bar that most conversations don’t involve politics.

“We just talk about sports,” Larry said. “No politics?” Dickerson questioned. “Nah, we don’t talk about anything like that.”

A different Larry, sitting at a table next to the diner’s bar, answered Dickerson’s questions about what’s “appropriate” conversation.

“Is it dangerous to talk politics with people who you aren’t close with?” Dickerson asked Larry Griffin.

“Yes,” he answered with a smile.

It’s a topic that evokes passion, and when it’s safer not to talk about it, we were grateful that these people did.

“It means a great deal now days that so much is on the line,” said Griffin.