Conspiracy Theories on the Clinton Campaign Trail | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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Conspiracy Theories on the Clinton Campaign Trail
BY Noelle Walker

The election has been the talk of talk radio. Dallas is no different.

A week before election day, the way the candidates have been talking to and about one another was a topic of discussion at Heaven 97 KHVN.

"Boy, this election sure has been stressing many of us out," KHVN News Director Robert Ashley told listeners. "Now Hillary Clinton has contended that Donald Trump has said this or said that about a little bit of everybody. What's your assessment? Is that helping or hurting?"

His guest, Pastor Sam Fenceway from Mount Olive Church in Plano responded, "He's saying things about her. She's saying things about him. No one knows what the truth really is."

One of the lingering storylines is about Clinton's supposedly declining health. Trump has repeatedly said "she lacks the mental and physical stamina."

In August, Clinton made light of it on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

"Well this has become one of their themes," Clinton told Kimmel. "Here, take my pulse while I'm talking to you," she said, flopping her arm on the host's desk. 

Three weeks later, Clinton stumbled and had to be helped into her van after leaving a 9/11 ceremony early. Her campaign later revealed she had pneumonia. The episode helped spur on one of the more bizarre conspiracy theories that Clinton has a body double. Social media help propagate the theory with repost after repost.

Clinton isn't just the target of these theories. In 1998, then First Lady Clinton alleged a "vast right wing conspiracy" while defending her husband. More recently, the Clinton campaign has questioned whether there is a tie between Wikileaks emails, Russia and Donald Trump. So far, there's been nothing conclusive to link them all.

"If you were talking to Hillary, if you were talking to Donald now," Ashley asked his talk show guests. "What would you say to them?" "I've already started working on a blog for November 9," Pastor Gene Wilkes of Legacy Church in Plano replied. "It's called 'What Do We Do Now?'"