Manufacturer Calls Recall of Shades "Over the Top"

Government recalls 50 million shades and blinds

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBCDFW.com
    The government on Tuesday issued a recall for Roman shades and roll-up blinds, saying they pose a safety risk to children.

    The owner of a Garland company that makes window shades said Tuesday he doesn’t agree with the government’s massive recall of 50 million window coverings, but will change designs to make them safer.

    "All of our blinds come with cord separators' that basically keep the cords from becoming a noose,” said Ed Williams, chief executive officer of Texton.

    Manufacturer Calls Recall of Shades "Over the Top"

    [DFW] Manufacturer Calls Recall of Shades "Over the Top"
    A Garland company that makes window shades will change its designs. (Published Thursday, Feb 4, 2010)

    The cords unsnap under pressure, he said.

    Williams’ grandfather started the business, Texton, in the 1940s. It employs about 50 people.

    The government on Tuesday issued a recall for other Roman shades and roll-up blinds without similar safety features, saying they pose a safety risk to children.

    Eight children have died and more than a dozen nearly strangled on cords since 2001, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said.

    But Williams said he doesn’t believe the recall is necessary.

    "I think this is a little bit over the top,” he said. “This product has been around for over 2,000 years."

    Roman shades were invented in the Roman empire, he said.

    But his company plans to change its design to make them safer. One design already being manufactured uses a crank instead of a cord.

    "We're going to have to dance to what the CPSC is mandating, and we are going to be as compliant as they insist,” he said.

    Consumers can obtain a free retrofit kit by calling 1-800-506-4636 or online here.

    For Roman shades, rings clip the loops into place, preventing them from moving.

    "They render the product basically inoperable, but we are including that," Williams said.

    Whatever the future design, there will always be a need for some kind of window covering to keep the sun out, Williams said.

    "We're going to take the positive approach to this and keep going,” he said.

    More: Texton's AudraGuard system