JFK 50: Remembering the Kennedy Assassination

JFK 50: Remembering the Kennedy Assassination

JFK 50: Remembering the Kennedy Assassination

Bush Honors JFK on Assassination Anniversary

Bush described the events of Nov. 22, 1963, as a "dark episode" in U.S. history

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    Former President George W. Bush has remembered John F. Kennedy as a defender of liberty. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

    Former President George W. Bush has remembered John F. Kennedy as a defender of liberty.

    Bush on Friday released a statement honoring the slain president on the 50th anniversary of the assassination in Dallas.

    Bush described the events of Nov. 22, 1963, as a "dark episode" in U.S. history. The 43rd president says Kennedy dedicated himself to public service and "his example moved Americans to do more for our country."

    Bush, who lives in Dallas, says the 35th president believed in the greatness of the United States and the righteousness of liberty -- and defended both.

    JFK and His Father: A Special Bond

    [NY] JFK and His Father: A Special Bond
    David Nasaw, the author of “The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy," discusses how Joseph P. Kennedy developed a special bond with JFK, one of his nine children.

    Read the full statement below:

    "Today we remember a dark episode in our Nation's history, and we remember the leader whose life was cut short 50 years ago.  John F. Kennedy dedicated himself to public service, and his example moved Americans to do more for our country.  He believed in the greatness of the United States and the righteousness of liberty, and he defended them.  On this solemn anniversary, Laura and I join our fellow citizens in honoring our 35th President."

    Joe Kennedy: A Father's Grief

    [NY] Joe Kennedy: A Father's Grief
    David Nasaw, the author of “The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy,” recounts the moment John F. Kennedy's father, who had a stroke years earlier and was unable to speak, is told of his son's assassination.