<![CDATA[NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth - TCU Drug Bust]]> Copyright 2014 http://www.nbcdfw.com/feature/tcu-drug-bust http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC+5-KXAS+Logo+for+Google+News.png NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth http://www.nbcdfw.com en-us Fri, 19 Dec 2014 05:54:51 -0600 Fri, 19 Dec 2014 05:54:51 -0600 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[TCU QB Released From Jail]]> Fri, 05 Oct 2012 07:48:02 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcu-casey-pachell-jail-release-100412.jpg

TCU starting quarterback Casey Pachall has been suspended indefinitely after being arrested near campus early Thursday on a charge of driving while intoxicated.

According to the Fort Worth police, an officer observed a driver fail to stop at a stop sign when he pulled out in front of him on the 3000-block of W. Devitt Street shortly before 1 a.m.  The officer also said the driver hit the curb.

The officer stopped the driver and that's when he learned the driver was the Horned Frogs starting quarterback.

Pachall, 21, was arrested on a charge of driving while intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration level greater than .15. NBC 5 has learned that Pachall's BAC was estimated to be .17, more than twice the legal limit. Pachall posted $1,000 bond and was released from jail at about 1:45 p.m.

His parents were there when Paschall got out of jail. His father said he learned his son had been arrested when he got a text from a member of the media.

"Well you gotta understand we raised this kid so when you see your little kid as a baby, you don't expect things like this to happen and it's just unfortunate," said Stan Paschall. "We're going to get through this, God is going to be with us and this is a wake-up call, for him, it's been more than a wake-up call, it's a wake-up call for all of us."

His father also questioned if Casey would get as much attention if he wasn't a football star at TCU.

"Casey's not the only one who's been in situations like this--you know, his problem is that he's a starting quarterback, you know, and that's why we're in this position right now. If he was just a regular student at TCU you guys wouldn't be talking to me right now," said Stan Paschall. "He's got a lot more responsibility on his shoulders and so he needs to be responsible for himself, and so we're going to start that journey and we'll see where it leads us."

In a statement released Thursday morning, head coach Gary Patterson said he has suspended Pachall indefinitely. 

"Casey Pachall has been suspended indefinitely from competition. My job as a head coach is to win games, educate our kids and help them with their lives," Patterson said in a statement Thursday morning.

Patterson is not expected to speak further on the arrest until after the Frogs game against Iowa State on Saturday.  

TCU sophomore basketball player Kyan Anderson said learning of Pachall's arrest was disappointing.

"We’re all here trying to get free school. I think you should take advantage of that and just to throw it away like that is irresponsible," said Anderson. "Disappointing, representing your school and things like that, it’s disappointing."

Raymond Bozmans, a freshman track and field athlete at TCU, said that collegiate athletes are role models, though everyone makes bad decisions from time to time.

"Bad decision.  Everyone has those ... It’s starting to add up, his perception is starting to go down with people on the outside," Bozmans said. "It does impact us a little bit negatively. That’s just one person, we do a lot of other good stuff here."

The university issued the following statement late Thursday morning:

TCU has clear expectations for its students: that they behave in an ethical manner, abide by campus policies and adhere to the law. The University has programs and policies in place to help students make healthy choices.  Violations of university policies result in a judicial process that outlines University sanctions as well as students’ responsibilities. Ultimately students make their own choices, but the University’s goal is to help them stay in school, stay healthy and stay on track.

Redshirt freshman Trevone Boykin, out of West Mesquite High School, is now expected to start in place of Pachall for the Horned Frogs.

Quarterback Has History of Drug Use

Pachall had lived in the same house with former TCU linebacker Tanner Brock,  who was among several players arrested last February for marijuana possession during a campus-wide drug bust.

After those arrests, in an interview with officers, Pachall admitted to drug use but was not arrested at that time. TCU later confirmed Pachall had failed a team drug test on Feb. 1, but was allowed to stay on the team after completing a drug and alcohol awareness program ordered by the university.

“We have policies and educational programs in place to help guide our student-athletes,” Patterson said in a statement when news of the drug test surfaced in August. “We are committed to helping them make healthy choices and have moved forward.”

NBC 5's Scott Gordon, Newy Scruggs, Kendra Lyn and Andres Gutierrez contributed to this report. Check back and refresh this page for the latest update.

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<![CDATA[No Team Punishment For TCU QB]]> Sun, 05 Aug 2012 17:33:31 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Casey+Pachall+TCU.jpg

Casey Pachall walked to the podium and spoke for one minute.  He had a prepared speech but no notes and he did not take questions.

"I truly do apologize for what's been said and done on my behalf lately and in the past," Pachall began.

WIthout getting specific on what he was apologizing for, Pachall continued.

"I know I'm not perfect but I've learned from those mistakes and I'm still learning.  It's a day to day process for me trying to be a better person and role model and leader for this team, this community and this university."

NBC 5 asked Coach Gary Patterson if he disciplined his QB for his failing a drug test and admitting to using marijuana and cocaine.  Patterson said, "No."  He said the university had Pachall go through a drug and alcohol awareness program and he said that was enough.

Patterson got defensive when asked if he wishes he would have address the team's illegal drug issues before spring practice.  Patterson said he was on top of things kicking four players off the team for using drugs before they were arrested.

"I was already ahead of the situation," said Patterson.  "I already knew all that before anybody was arrested so I already did what my part was.  I don't think we're behind on anything."

"When I have younger football teams I have more knuckleheads," said Patterson. "This year I have 12 seniors, 11 juniors and 80 to 85 percent of my team is freshmen and sophomores.... I probably have more knuckeheads."

Patterson said one of his jobs is to get his players to grow up.  If too many players get kicked off the team they will not do well in their first season in the more competitive Big 12 Conference.



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Coach: TCU QB Failed Drug Test]]> Fri, 03 Aug 2012 22:59:31 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/132483260.jpg

TCU's starting quarterback Casey Pachall admitted to police that he had used illegal drugs -- including marijuana and cocaine -- and had failed a drug test, according to a police report obtained by the university's student newspaper.

The athlete's admission came the same day last spring that officers swept through campus and rounded up drug suspects, the Daily Skiff said.

Pachall was questioned but not arrested in the raid.

His roommate, Tanner Brock, was arrested on a charge of selling marijuana. Brock has since pleaded guilty and received probation.

TCU football coach Gary Patterson confirmed the report in a statement:

"We were aware of Casey testing positive on Feb. 1. I have always taken a very strong stand on student-athlete health and welfare. We have policies and educational programs in place to help guide our student-athletes. We are committed to helping them make healthy choices and have moved forward. We have had 25 drug tests in the last 18 months, including one by the NCAA at the Rose Bowl. We've had six drug tests since February."

According to the report, which the Skiff posted online, Pachall said he had smoked marijuana as recently as a week before the Feb. 15 raid and had smoked with Tanner at least once in the past.

"Casey stated that he has used cocaine and Ecstasy in the past," the report said. "Both were just a one-time thing and (he) hasn't done either since."

In a statement late Friday, TCU did not address any specifics but said: "We try our best to educate our students about making wise choices, and that is why we have policies and educational programs in place to help guide them."

The statement also said, "Students are subject to disciplinary action if they violate any part of our code of student conduct."

The police report surfaced just two days before TCU's football team is scheduled to report to campus on Sunday.

Several athletes charged in the bust have received probation and no longer attend TCU.

More: Read the Daily Skiff's article and the police report



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[3 Former TCU Players Sentenced]]> Tue, 24 Jul 2012 22:44:25 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/TCU-drug-mugs-19-fb-color.jpg

Three former Texas Christian University football players arrested on drug charges during a raid in February have been sentenced to probation, according to a report on TCU360.com, the university's student website.

Tanner Brock pleaded guilty June 7 to a charge of delivering between a quarter of an ounce and five pounds of marijuana.  He received four years probation and must take part in a drug offender education program, pay a $1,200 fine and participate in a DWI impact panel, the site reported.

TCU360.com reported Tyler Horn pleaded guilty to the same charge as Brock and received three years probation and must pay a $300 fine.

David Yendry pleaded guilty to four felony charges of delivery of marijuana between a quarter of an ounce and five pounds and was given three years probation and a $300 fine.  He also pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges of delivery of marijuana and must serve six months probation.  The probationary periods will be served concurrently, the paper reported.

If they fulfill their probation, the charges will be dropped. If they violate their probation, they may spend up to two years in jail and face a $10,000 fine.

Brock and Horn were among 16 charged by the Tarrant County District Attorney after more two dozen people were arrested in connection with the drug sting earlier this year in and around the TCU campus. The arrests came after a six-month investigation prompted by complaints from students, parents and others.

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<![CDATA[14 More Charged in TCU Drug Case]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 17:07:42 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcu-dfw-generic-01.jpg

Editor's Note: A previous version of this story incorrectly listed one of the charges against Peter Signavong. The Tarrant County District Attorney's Office provided NBC 5 with the incorrect information. NBC 5 regrets the error.

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office formally charged 14 more people in connection with the drug investigation at Texas Christian University.

Nine people were charged in March, bringing the total number of defendants in the case to 23.

The DA's office believes this will be the last of the indictments in the investigation.

The nine charged last month were: Devin Johnson, Earl Patrick Burke, Eric Lodge, Bud Dillard,  Cameron Forgie, Katherine Petrie, Jordan Sherman and William Hoffman.

The 14 charged April 5 are listed below. 

  • Scott Lee Anderson, 20, of Fort Worth, has been charged with two cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds, in a drug-free zone. He was also charged with delivery of hydrocodone, less than 28 grams, in a drug-free zone and delivery of less than 1 gram of oxycodone in a drug-free zone. All four charges are third-degree felonies punishable by two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.
  • Tanner Wilson Brock, 21, of Fort Worth, has been charged with three cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- all three charges are state jail felonies punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing a usable quantity of marijuana of 2 ounces or less, a Class B misdemeanor.
  • Taylor Cowdin, 21, of Fort Worth, was charged with one case of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds, and one case of possessing a usable quantity of marijuana of less than 5 pounds but more than 4 ounces. Both charges are state jail felonies punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine.
  • Matthew Davis, 19, of Fort Worth, was charged with four cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- all four charges are state jail felonies punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing a usable quantity of marijuana, 2 to 4 ounces, a Class A misdemeanor.
  • Jordan Donaldson, 22, of Fort Worth, was charged with delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing less than 2 ounces of marijuana in a drug-free zone -- a Class A misdemeanor.
  • Eduardo J. Hernandez, 20, of Fort Worth, has been charged with four cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- each case is a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana in a drug-free zone and possessing a prohibited weapon, knuckles -- both are Class A misdemeanors punishable by up to a year in the county jail.
  • Tyler Andrew Horn, 21, of Fort Worth, has been charged with delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds --a  state jail felony punishable by 180 days to 2 years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with delivery of marijuana, less than 1/4 ounce -- a Class A misdemeanor.
  • Jonathan Jones, 20, of Fort Worth, has been charged with delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds, in a drug-free zone -- a third-degree felony punishable by 2 to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing cocaine, less than a gram in a drug-free zone -- a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.
  • Michael Gragg King, 20, of Fort Worth, has been charged with three cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- each case is a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana -- a class B misdemeanor.
  • Hunter McLaughlin, 24, of Fort Worth, has been charged with four cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- each case is a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine.
  • Richard Clay Putney, 20, of Richmond, VA, has been charged with two cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds, in a drug-free zone -- both charges are third-degree felonies punishable by two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with delivering less than 1/4 ounce of marijuana in a drug-free zone and possessing a usable quantity of marijuana of 2 ounces or less in a drug-free zone -- both of those charges are Class B misdemeanors.
  • Peter Signavong, 21, of Fort Worth, has been charged with four cases of delivering cocaine, more than 1 gram but less than 4 grams -- all four cases are second-degree felonies punishable by 2 to 20 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with delivering less thane 1 gram of ecstasy -- a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing a usable quantity of marijuana, less than 5 pounds but more than 4 ounces; possessing less than 1 gram of methamphetamine; and possessing less than 1 gram of cocaine -- all three charges are state jail felonies punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with delivery of marijuana, less than 1/4 ounce -- a Class A misdemeanor.
  • David Yendry, 20, of Fort Worth, has been charged with three cases of delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds, in a drug-free zone -- each case is a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. He has also been charged with delivery of marijuana, more than 1/4 ounce but less than 5 pounds -- a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility. He has also been charged with two cases of delivery of less than 1/4 ounce of marijuana– both of which are Class A misdemeanors.
  • Cynthia Zambrano, 20, of Sansom Park, has been charged with two cases of delivery of oxymorphone, less than 1 gram -- both cases are state jail felonies punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine.

Editor’s Note: The name of one of the people involved in this case has been removed from this article because the case against him was dismissed and his records were expunged.


Complete Coverage: TCU Drug BustFind complete coverage of the TCU Drug Bust that charged students, football players, and others in selling drugs on and around the TCU campus. See articles, videos, galleries and more related to the bust in our special setion
 



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[9th Person Charged in TCU Bust]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 17:08:04 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcu-dfw-generic-01.jpg

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office formally charged another person Monday in connection with a drug investigation at Texas Christian University.

Devin Johnson, the first member of the Horned Frogs football team to be charged, brings the total number of defendants to nine.

Johnson, 21, of Fort Worth, was charged with the three cases of delivery of marijuana, more than ¼ but less than five pounds – each case is a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to a $10,000 fine.

In an affidavit, Johnson was quoted as saying that 82 people failed a surprise drug test given to the football team. A source later told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that only five players failed that test.

Three other TCU football players were arrested in the drug bust last month.  So far, they have not been charged.

Eight other people were charged last week, including Earl Patrick Burke, Eric Lodge, Bud Dillard, Cameron Forgie, Katherine Petrie, Jordan Sherman and William Hoffman.

Editor’s Note: The name of one of the people involved in this case has been removed from this article because the case against him was dismissed and his records were expunged.


Complete Coverage: TCU Drug BustFind complete coverage of the TCU Drug Bust that charged students, football players, and others in selling drugs on and around the TCU campus. See articles, videos, galleries and more related to the bust in our special setion 
 



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[7th, 8th Person Charged in TCU Drug Bust]]> Fri, 09 Mar 2012 16:23:52 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/104821174.jpg

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office formally charged two more people Friday morning in connection with a drug investigation at Texas Christian University.

Earl Patrick Burke and Eric Lodge are the latest to be charged. They bring the total number of defendants to eight.

•Earl Patrick Burke, 21, of Fort Worth, has been charged with delivery of alprazolam, more than 28 grams but less than 200 grams – a second degree felony punishable by 2 to 20 years in prison. He was also charged with two cases of delivery of alprazolam, less than 28 grams – each case is a third degree felony punishable up to 180 days to two years in a state jail facility. Additionally, he was charged with possessing less than 28 grams of alprazolam, a Class A misdemeanor, and possessing a usable quantity of marijuana of two ounces or less, a Class B misdemeanor.

•Eric Lodge, 22, of Fort Worth, was charged with possession of alprazolam, less than 28 grams – a class A misdemeanor.

Fort Worth police documents indicate that as many as 10 more arrests are possible and that the investigation is not over, but a police spokesman also declined to comment on the investigation Wednesday.

Six others were charged Wednesday and Thursday.

Complete Coverage: TCU Drug BustFind complete coverage of the TCU Drug Bust that charged students, football players, and others in selling drugs on and around the TCU campus. See articles, videos, galleries and more related to the bust in our special setion
 



Photo Credit: Getty Images/OJO Images]]>
<![CDATA[Six Now Charged in TCU Drug Case]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 17:08:43 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/court-gavel-generic-law.jpg

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office formally charged three more people Thursday in connection with a drug investigation at Texas Christian University.

Nearly 20 current and former students were arrested Feb. 15 during an early-raid at and around TCU, including four football players. An internal Fort Worth police memo listed 21 people the department issued warrants for.

On Thursday morning, Bud Dillard was charged with the following:

•Bud Pollard Dillard, 21, of Fort Worth, was charged with delivery of alprazolam, more than 28 grams but less than 200 grams - a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with possessing less than 28 grams of alprazolam, a Class A misdemeanor, and possessing a usable quantity of marijuana of two ounces or less, a Class B misdemeanor.

On Thursday afternoon, Cameron Forgie was added to the list of defendants.

• Cameron Jacob Forgie, 22, of Fort Worth, was charged with possessing less than 28 grams of alprazolam,  a Class A misdemeanor, and possessing a useable quantity of marijuana of two ounces or less, a Class B misdemeanor.

Fort Worth police documents indicate that as many as 10 more arrests are possible and that the investigation is not over, but a police spokesman also declined to comment on the investigation Wednesday.

Three others were charged Wednesday, Katherine Petrie, Jordan Sherman and William Hoffman.

Editor’s Note: The name of one of the people involved in this case has been removed from this article because the case against him was dismissed and his records were expunged.
 

Complete Coverage: TCU Drug BustFind complete coverage of the TCU Drug Bust that charged students, football players, and others in selling drugs on and around the TCU campus. See articles, videos, galleries and more related to the bust in our special setion
 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[DA Announces First TCU Drug Charges]]> Wed, 07 Mar 2012 19:36:04 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/handcuffs+hand+cuffs.jpg

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney's Office formally charged three people Wednesday in connection with a drug investigation at Texas Christian University.

Nearly 20 current and former students were arrested Feb. 15 during an early-raid at and around TCU, including four football players. An internal Fort Worth police memo listed 21 people the department issued warrants for.

  • William Joseph Hoffman, 20, of Dallas, was charged with delivery of alprazolam, less than 28 grams, in a drug free zone. It is a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and fine of up to $10,000.
  • Katherine Petrie, 20, of Azle, was charged with delivery of marijuana, more than one-fourth of an ounce but less than 5 pounds. It is state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and a fine of up to $10,000.
  • Jordan Sherman, 22, of Azle, was charged with delivery of marijuana, more than one-fourth of an ounce but less than 5 pounds. The charge is a state jail felony punishable by 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and a fine of up to $10,000.

A spokesperson for the district attorney declined to comment on the status of the other arrests but did say the office expected further charges to be filed Thursday.

The other suspects were accused of selling drugs to undercover officers at locations around the Fort Worth campus during a period of several months in late 2011 and early 2012.

Fort Worth police documents indicate that as many as 10 more arrests are possible and that the investigation is not over, but a police spokesman also declined to comment on the investigation Wednesday.

The legal developments came as TCU Chancellor Victor Boschini hosted a town hall meeting on campus Wednesday to discuss the past six years of accomplishments at the university and plans for the next six years.

As accomplishments, Boschini cited:

  • A new campus commons was completed with new student dorms and classroom space.
  • A major stadium renovation is under way for the successful Horned Frog football team.
  • More dorms are under construction to house more students on campus.

Boschini said the focus during the past six years has been improving campus facilities.

"In the next phase, we're saying, 'Let's raise more money and try to shape our student body, get more in scholarships, more for our endowment and more to hire faculty members,'" Boschini said.

The chancellor has been praised for quickly going public with the February arrests and for separating arrested students from the campus.

"I think people vote with their feet, and our admissions for next fall are running ahead of where they went last year," he said. "And so I think people feel like, if we have problems on our campus, we're going to address them."

Boschini said people around town have told him it is time to "move on" and that the drug arrests were weeks ago. But court and police action may keep the cases active for months to come.

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<![CDATA[Lawyers Question TCU Drug Raid]]> Thu, 01 Mar 2012 20:27:03 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Fort-Worth-Police-patch-on-.jpg

An internal Fort Worth police memo on the undercover drug investigation at Texas Christian University is raising new questions.

According to an "after action" report written five days after the Feb. 15 raid, 10 more arrests are on the way. Police would not say if those arrests would involve students.

The memo lists 21 people who had warrants. Fort Worth police would not comment on two of the names listed -- 20-year-old Alex Hofmann and 20-year-old William Hoffman.

TCU confirms both were former students.

Joe Wells, who represents Austin Michael Carpenter, a former TCU student, said he never received an arrest warrant. Carpenter is listed as being wanted in connection with the investigation.

The police memo also outlines what was seized during the early-morning raid, including weapons, cash, marijuana, prescription pills, cocaine, methamphetamine and vehicles.

Jim Shaw, an attorney who represents three of those arrested, said he questions the legality of the seizures because there were no search warrants.

"I don't think they had right to take them," he said. "No one gave them consent."

Shaw represents former TCU students Taylor Cowdin, Cynthia Zambrano and Eduardo Hernandez

Cowdin withdrew from TCU on Thursday. Shaw said his client withdrew right before a scheduled school hearing. He said it was a better option than the possible alternative -- expulsion.

"His mother was present, dad was present," he said. "There was a lot of anguish. He really just made decision this morning."



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Police: Warrants for 31 in TCU Drug Case]]> Thu, 01 Mar 2012 00:05:09 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NEW-TCU-drug-mugs-COLOR.jpg

The undercover drug investigation at Texas Christian University led to charges against 21 people and police could arrest another 10, according to an internal Fort Worth police memo obtained by NBC 5.

The memo states that 93 arrest warrants were issued for 31 people and said warrants would be processed for 10 additional people. However, the document only lists 21 names.

Fort Worth police spokesman Sgt. Pedro Criado said he could not comment on the possibility of any additional arrests but clarified that the total number was 31 people.

The police memo is an "after action" report written five days after the raid. It was obtained by NBC 5 on Wednesday after being requested under the Texas Open Records Act. (Read the report here.)

At a news conference on Feb. 15, just hours after officers rounded up suspects on and near campus, police announced a total of 17 arrests. At least three others who did not have warrants were arrested during the raid.

"On the day of execution, we were targeting the 18 listed, with warrants for two additional that we knew weren't in the area," Criado said.

He said one suspect turned himself in on Feb. 17.

The report also reveals police seized:

  • Nine weapons
  • $46,243 in cash
  • $29,000 in marijuana, prescription pills, cocaine and methamphetamine
  • 15 vehicles worth $253,890

Officers found a half-ounce of marijuana, a digital scale and five drug pipes in a search of Tanner Brock's house just off-campus, the memo said.

Brock, a standout linebacker on TCU's football team, was one of four players arrested in the sweep.

More: Fort Worth Police After Action Report

See NBC 5's Complete Coverage of the TCU Drug Bust

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<![CDATA[TCU Cases Still Not Filed in Court]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:13:19 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NEW-TCU-drug-mugs-COLOR.jpg

As the Texas Christian University football team began spring practice Friday, the drug arrests that separated four players from the team had still not resulted in formal court charges.

Twenty people were arrested during a Feb. 15 sting, including 17 people accused of selling drugs to an undercover officer. Three people were arrested on suspicion of drug possession during the raid.

Another person who was sought during the raid but was not taken into custody turned himself in to police two days later.

Fort Worth police released an arrest warrant that day for the wrong man, even though an officer had sworn all the information was correct. The warrant included a photograph of the wrong man.

He was not arrested.

David Sloan, a Fort Worth criminal defense attorney who specializes in defending drug suspects, said the mistake brings the officer’s credibility into question on all the warrants he handled.

"It's not to say the state can't take these cases to trial," he said. "But I think any attorney worth their salt is going to want to visit with this officer about the fact that he's already misidentified one person in this investigation."

Sloane said police should have made the officer select all of the suspects from photo lineups as Fort Worth narcotics officers have done in other cases.

Warrants in the TCU cases indicate that the undercover officers only selected individual pictures, in most cases, from driver's license records.

"A photo lineup should have been done on each and every one of these situations, where a person is alleged to have sold an undercover officer drugs and then walked away from the scene and there's no other identifying information for that," Sloan said.

Last week, Fort Worth police spokesman Sgt. Pedro Criado said the warrant would be corrected and reissued.

On Friday, he declined to comment on the case.

Tarrant County District Attorney's Office spokeswoman Melody McDonald said the cases are still working their way through system and that no decisions have been made on filing them.

More: See NBC 5's Complete Coverage of TCU Drug Arrests

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<![CDATA[Former Horned Frog on Drug Scandal: "Wow"]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:18:47 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Terrance-Maiden-021612.jpg

A TCU National Alumni Board member and former football player said Thursday that he is disappointed by the school's drug scandal.

Seventeen people accused of selling drugs on or near the university were arrested in an early-morning drug sting Wednesday.

Terrance Maiden said his response to the news was, "Wow." It only stung more that four of the people arrested were football players.

He and his twin brother, Tim, played for the Horned Frogs until 2000.

"I look at it as having one of those step-brothers you aren't always so proud of," Maiden said.

His and his brother's experiences on the field and in the class room have led to professional success. Terrance Maiden is a commercial real estate developer, and his brother is a bank president.

Together, they founded the Two-Wins Foundation, a charity that helps inner-city children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The Maidens regularly take students on college tours starting with their alma mater. Now, they have some explaining to do about their university.

"I think you be honest; you share with the kids that this is still a wonderful university," Terrance Maiden said.

TCU head coach Gary Patterson was his defensive coordinator. Maiden said he has no doubt that Patterson immediately ordered drug testing upon hearing that athletes could be using drugs.

Maiden said he suspects the growing pains of success is partly to blame for players getting involved in drugs.

When TCU was known more as a little school that occasionally beat the big boys, the team always struggled together and stayed humble, he said. He theorized that winning Rose Bowls and finishing atop national polls meant attracting some athletes that put their own desires ahead of the team.

"A lot of times, with success comes a lot of opportunities to do stuff that is not acceptable," Maiden said.

TCU and drugs now will be in the same sentence for the foreseeable future, he said.

"I'm a Horned Frog, and I always will be, through the good and the bad, but unfortunately, we're kind of living through the bad right now," Maiden said.

More: Click here to see NBC 5's complete coverage



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Attorney Slams Investigation Into "TCU 17"]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:18:47 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/jim-shaw-021612.jpg

The attorney for two of those accused of dealing drugs at and around Texas Christian University says the early-morning drug sting went too far.

"It's destroying the lives of 17 people," defense attorney Jim Shaw said.

He met Thursday with Eduardo Hernandez, a 20-year-old former TCU student who is accused of delivering marijuana four times in November and December.

Shaw also represents another of what he calls the "TCU 17" -- Taylor Davis Cowdin, also 20. Cowdin, a TCU student, is accused of delivering marijuana to an undercover officer on Feb. 1.

"These are serious charges," Shaw said. "They could involve the possibility of going to prison, but the way it's been handled from this point is beyond the realm of acceptability."

Some of the deals allegedly occurred on TCU's campus, a drug-free zone, which can lead to tougher sentences.

But Shaw said the investigation and the on-campus, pre-dawn raid went too far.

"A phone call to these 17 people would've gotten them to turn themselves in," he said.

Shaw said police should have moved in immediately instead of launching a six-month investigation.

"Six months ago, bust the guy you know did something and let the deterrent effect start right there," he said.

Shaw said he would fight to keep the "children" he represents out of prison but worries about the damage already done.

"We'll talk about what their future is now that they've been labeled a criminal, a member of the TCU 17 and see if we can right their ship," he said.

The Tarrant County District Attorney's Office decides what charges the accused will face. A spokeswoman said part of that decision will rely on the results of lab tests done on evidence from the police investigation.

Fort Worth police said they are questioning the suspects for more information. Investigators said they expect to make more arrests, likely more TCU students.

Police said the investigation would continue for many more months.

NBC 5's Deborah Ferguson contributed to this report.

More: Click here to see NBC 5's complete coverage



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Report: Only 5 TCU Players Failed Drug Test]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:18:47 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Tanner-Brock-arrest-021612.jpg

Concerns about rampant drug use on TCU's football may be unfounded.

According to a confidential source, only five members of the team failed a Feb. 1 drug test, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported Thursday.

Two TCU football players arrested in a drug sting Wednesday allegedly told undercover officers that most of the team would fail the test.

But the Star-Telegram said its source said five players out of 102 tested positive for marijuana. Eleven had trace amounts within the margin of error, while the remaining 86 players were cleared, the newspaper said.

The university said in a statement Thursday that it would not release any drug test results.

"Five players -- that makes it totally different, as far as the TCU image thing," said Randy Galloway, Star-Telegram columnist and talk show host. "But the overall picture is, four players were considered drug dealers on the TCU campus; that hurts."

But Galloway said he believes the Horned Frogs can overcome it and avoid team punishment.

"There is no indication the NCAA is going to be involved -- they can get involved in anything -- but this looks like something they stay out of," he said.

Defensive back Devin Johnson allegedly told undercover officers that "82 people failed" the drug test, according to his arrest affidavit.

And Tanner Brock, a TCU linebacker, allegedly told an undercover officer that most of the team would fail the drug test, according to his arrest affidavit. He also allegedly said that he and teammate Tyler Horn -- was also arrested in Wednesday's sting -- thought only about 20 people would pass.

The Star-Telegram reported Wednesday that Patterson ordered the Feb. 1 drug test after a prize recruit said he would not attend TCU because of drug use by players.

Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr. said in the statement Thursday that any student who uses drugs is "one too many."

"Our students are primarily 18-21 years old. They come from all walks of life, and they contribute to the university in different ways," he said. "Sometimes, they make choices we don’t understand. We are proudest of them when they learn and grow from their mistakes. There is no doubt that students fall short from time to time, but we also know that they, as we, are committed to getting back up and moving forward."

NBC 5's Ken Kalthoff contributed to this report.

More: Click here to see NBC 5's complete coverage



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Lawyer Questions Mistaken ID in TCU Case]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:18:46 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcu-arrests-generic.jpg

Two lawyers are taking Fort Worth police to task over the handling of a drug sting involving Texas Christian University students.

The attorney for a man whose picture was incorrectly released by Fort Worth police on Wednesday is demanding a formal written apology so that the misidentified man has something to show should he ever be questioned about the TCU case. The lawyer said police have not responded to the request.

Fort Worth police incorrectly named the man in an arrest warrant Wednesday, releasing his full name, date of birth and photograph.

Police said they still plan to issue a corrected arrest warrant.

Attorney Joe David Wells said Friday that he represents Austin Carpenter, a former TCU student. He said he is aware that his client may be a suspect in the ongoing investigation but questioned how prosecutors could pursue charges against his client or the other people arrested in Wednesday's sting.

In a statement released Friday, Wells said:

"In the event that the authorities in Tarrant County decide to pursue charges against my client, I look forward to a vigorous cross examination of the officer who swore under oath that he dealt with a different Austin Carpenter than my client. The inclusion of a photograph with the warrant is highly problematic for the authorities. Texas law does not require the inclusion of a photograph for the issuance of an arrest warrant. The only reason for including a photograph in the warrant is for publicity. Clearly, the investigating authorities are more interested in headlines than justice. Their failed attempt at a photographic perp walk could result in acquittals of all of the students charged in this scandal."

Meanwhile, TCU student Hunter Wallace McLaughlin, 24, turned himself in to Fort Worth police Friday.

McLaughlin's attorney promptly posted $7,500 bond, and he left the Tarrant County jail.

McLaughlin is accused of four counts of delivery of marijuana on four occasions in October and November.

Fort Worth police originally said McLaughlin had been arrested Wednesday morning but said later that night that he had never been in custody.

Fort Worth police originally said one person had been arrested "on-sight" during the early-morning drug bust on campus Wednesday. But on Friday, police confirmed that three other TCU students were arrested on suspicion drug possession during the sting.

TCU360.com reported that Cameron Jacob Forgie, 22; Jordan Michael Donaldson, 22; and Eric C. Lodge, 22; were arrested. Police said all three had bonded out of jail as of Friday afternoon.

Fort Worth police say the investigation is not over and there could be more arrests in the case.

More: Click here to see NBC 5's complete coverage

]]>
<![CDATA[Mac Engel on TCU Drug Bust]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:05:22 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/20122012022010h58m47s169_722x406_2199096806.jpg Sports writer and TCU professor Mac Engel discusses the TCU Drug Bust scandal on NBC 5's Out of Bounds.]]> <![CDATA[Fort Worth Urged To Wear Purple on Tuesday]]> Sun, 19 Feb 2012 16:44:28 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/TCU-Sign-021712.jpg

This week, members of the Fort Worth community may make a special point to show support of Texas Christian University in light of recent drug arrests.

Last Wednesday, police arrested 18 students and former students during a drug bust on and near the TCU campus.  The night after a much-publicized drug sweep, the president of TCU’s Interfraternity Council was arrested on a charge of furnishing alcohol to minors. Eleven minors were also cited for alcohol violations.
 

Monday at 7:00 p.m., the TCU Wind Symphony concert will take place in the Ed Landreth Auditorium.  In an email to NBC 5, TCU alumna Amy Radford invited "the public to see some hard working scholar musicians doing the outstanding work that is occurring in 99% of the University every day."

On Tuesday, the Fort Worth City Council encourages all residents and businesses to wear purple in support of TCU.

"This is our opportunity to stand up for TCU and show that everyone in Fort Worth loves our Horned Frogs," Mayor Betsy Price said in a statement. "TCU sent a strong message that any attempt to harm its students or its reputation won't be tolerated, and we fully support them."

In 1873, Addison and Randolph Clark founded TCU Thorp Spring, Texas. It moved to Waco in 1895.  TCU relocated to Fort Worth in 1910.
 



Photo Credit: NBC 5]]>
<![CDATA[Exclusive: Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcuarrestsgeneric_722x406_2197089749.jpg An untold number of students were arrested in a drug bust Wednesday morning on and around the TCU campus.]]> <![CDATA[Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team]]> Thu, 16 Feb 2012 11:34:50 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tanner-brock-mugshot.jpg

Statements made to undercover narcotics officers allude to a disturbing problem of drug use among members of the Horned Frog football team, according to arrest warrant affidavits.

According to linebacker Tanner Brock's affidavit, he told an undercover officer that head coach Gary Patterson sprung a surprise drug test on the team on Feb. 1 and that most of the players on the roster would fail.

"Ya, they caught us slipping," Brock was quoted as saying in the affidavit.

Later that evening, Brock told the undercover officer that, "I failed that bitch for sure," referring to the drug test. But he said he wasn't too worried about it because there "would be about 60 people being screwed."

In the affidavit, Brock is then quoted as saying that he and teammate Tyler Horn looked over the team roster and concluded that there were only about 20 people on the team who would pass the drug test.

According to his arrest affidavit, undercover officers asked defensive back Devin Johnson about the Feb. 1 drug test and he replied, "What can they do? Eighty-two people failed it."

TCU's Lisa Albert told NBC 5 that the university couldn't verify comments made by players and reported in affidavits because they were made in the context of a drug buy.

"TCU drug tests its student-athletes on a regular basis," she said. "Any student found in violation of TCU's drug abuse policy is subject to university disciplinary action."

The Star-Telegram reported that Patterson ordered the drug test on Signing Day after a prize recruit said he would not attend TCU because of drug use by players. The results of the surprise test have not been made public.

See a complete list of those arrested Wednesday and their alleged offenses here. See the complete affidavits here.


Previous Coverage:
Article: Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team
Article: Names Revealed in TCU Drug Bust
Article: Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges
Article: Chancellor Victor Boschnini Statement on TCU Drug Bust
Gallery: Drug Bust Mug Shots
Video: TCU Drug Bust Timeline
Video: TCU Drug Sting Nets 17 Arrests
Video: Exclusive - Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)
Video: "We Have Clear Expectations for Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.
Video: "Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief Magee
Video: Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust

]]>
<![CDATA[TCU Leans on Faith as Drug Scandal Unfolds]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcuprayervigil021512_722x406_2197575225.jpg In the wake of 18 arrests during a drug bust on and near campus, TCU students and faculty prayed for strength.]]> <![CDATA[Drug Sales Made Across Southwestern FW]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:18:48 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/17-TCU-drug-mugs.jpg

The 17 people arrested in Wednesday's Texas Christian University sting sold drugs across southwestern Fort Worth, according to arrest affidavits.

The affidavits list more than a dozen spots between Interstate 20 and Interstate 30 west of Interstate 35W. They range as far south as the Hulen Mall area and as far north as the University Park Village area.

The locations include a Kroger, a CVS, private residences and a fraternity house.

 

 

Eighteen people, including current TCU students, football players and former students, after a six-month investigation by Fort Worth and TCU police.

All but one of those arrested are accused of dealing drugs. One person was arrested on a possession of marijuana charge during the drug sting.

According to arrest affidavits, drug deals occurred across the southwestern side of Fort Worth.

Neighbors of some of the suspects said they were shocked by the arrests.

"The fact that they're TCU football players and they set role model for community -- they should have been more careful about what they were doing," said Jennifer Holbrook, who lives near David Yendry and Tyler Horn.

Yendry and Horn are both accused of selling marijuana.

Quincy Miller, lives next door to Tyler Cowdin and Michael King, who are both accused of selling marijuana from their home.

"I could see them throwing out bong water, but they're college kids -- didn't think anything of it," he said. "I was sure they were smoking. had no clue they were selling."

Sharon Thomas, who lives blocks away from campus on Waits Avenue near Bud Dillard and Earl Burke, said both were friendly.

Dillard and Burke are accused of selling prescription drugs.


Previous Coverage:
Article: Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team
Article: Names Revealed in TCU Drug Bust
Article: Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges
Article: Chancellor Victor Boschnini Statement on TCU Drug Bust
Gallery: Drug Bust Mug Shots
Video: TCU Drug Bust Timeline
Video: TCU Drug Sting Nets 17 Arrests
Video: Exclusive - Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)
Video: "We Have Clear Expectations for Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.
Video: "Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief Magee
Video: Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust



Photo Credit: Fort Worth Police]]>
<![CDATA[Drug Bust Mug Shots]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 19:05:53 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/newest-17-TCU-Mugs.jpg The names of 16 people arrested in a drug bust on and near the campus of Texas Christian University were released Wednesday morning, just hours after they were all taken into police custody.]]> <![CDATA[What Does the Drug Bust Mean for TCU?]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/vlcsnap2012021519h06m54s212_722x406_2197441464.jpg Star-Telegram reporter Bud Kennedy talks with Nonstop Nightly about how the arrests of 18 people could be a good thing for TCU.]]> <![CDATA["This Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief McGee]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/vlcsnap2012021510h10m05s243_722x406_2197106405.jpg TCU Police Chief Steve McGee on the campus drug busts.]]> <![CDATA["We Have Clear Expectations For Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/vlcsnap2012021509h59m41s87_722x406_2197106117.jpg TCU Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr. on the arrest of 17 students on drug charges.]]> <![CDATA[18 Arrested in TCU Drug Bust]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 17:06:09 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/17-TCU-drug-mugs.jpg

Editor's Note: Fort Worth police incorrectly identified Austin Williams Carpenter, 26, as one of the 19 arrested at TCU. Fort Worth police late Wednesday afternoon notified the media of their error. Fort Worth police said the incorrect warrant was canceled and that a corrected warrant would be issued. Police originally said 19 people were arrested, but Fort Worth police said later Wednesday that only 18 people were arrested.

A drug bust on and around Texas Christian University's campus in Fort Worth early Wednesday morning led to the arrest of 18 people, including four football players, school officials say.

During a news conference Wednesday morning, TCU officials said the students arrested sold drugs to undercover narcotics officers on campus and off-campus at a nearby 7-Eleven, a Kroger and a Hooters restaurant.

"There is no doubt, all of those arrested today are drug dealers," said Steve McGee, TCU chief of police. "These individuals engaged in hand-to-hand delivery for money with undercover narcotics agents. We will continue to work proactively to curtail drug use on the TCU campus."

Police released 19 arrest warrants at 11 a.m. One of those warrants was later canceled, and another warrant is for a student who was not arrested and is still at large.

Fort Worth police said Wednesday night that 18 arrests were made in total. The department said 17 people were arrested on arrest warrants. Another person was arrested "as a result of an on-view drug violation" on suspicion of possession of marijuana.

According to the warrants, the following student-athletes were arrested on suspicion of selling marijuana: David (D.J.) W. Yendrey, a junior defensive tackle from Edna; Devin Johnson, a junior defensive back from Oklahoma City; Tanner Wilson Brock Jr., a junior linebacker from Copperas Cove; Tyler (Ty) Horn, a sophomore offensive tackle from McGregor.

"There are days people want to be a head football coach, but today is not one of those days," head football coach Gary Patterson said. "As I heard the news this morning, I was first shocked, then hurt, and now I'm mad. Under my watch, drugs and drug use by TCU's student-athletes will not be tolerated by me or any member of my coaching staff, period. Our program is respected nationally for its strong ethics and, for that reason, the players arrested today were separated from TCU by the university."

According to the warrants, the other 12 students are: Bud Pollard Dillard, Cynthia (Cindy) Jaqueline Zambrano, Earl Patrick Burke, Jonathan Blake Jones (not to be confused with the Jonathan Jones who is on the football team and is in no way connected to this case), Katherine Ann Peitre, Matthew Iarossi Davis, Michael Gragg King, Peter Signavong, Richard Clay Putney, Scott (Scooter) Lee Anderson and Taylor Davis Cowdin.

In addition, former student Eduardo Hernandez was arrested.

Fort Worth police said Austin Williams Carpenter, 26, was also arrested but later said the arrest warrant listed the wrong person and included the wrong photograph.

Austin Williams Carpenter, 26, is not involved in the case. He told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that he attended Texas Tech, not TCU.

Fort Worth police said the incorrect warrant was canceled and that a corrected warrant would be issued.

Fort Worth police also originally said Hunter Wallace McLaughlin, a TCU student, had been arrested Wednesday morning. But police said later Wednesday that McLaughlin had not been arrested and was still at large.

Click here to read the entire collection of arrest warrants in relation to this story. NOTE: Document contains 207 pages of warrants in PDF format and is 15MB in size.

McGee said the investigation began six months ago after multiple tips from students and parents.

"This shows that TCU students, staff and the community will not tolerate this kind of behavior on the TCU campus," McGee said.

McGee said the students sold marijuana, cocaine, Molly (Ecstasy in powder form), Ecstasy in pill form, acid and prescription drugs including Xanax, hydrocodone and others similar to OxyContin.

TCU Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr. said the busts are not football problem, but a student problem. He said it was shocking and disappointing to learn of the investigation and arrests.

In a letter to students earlier Wednesday morning, Boschini said the university has never experienced such a magnitude of student arrests. The students who are involved were immediately separated from the school and subject to expulsion, he said.

In recent years, TCU police made only five on-campus arrests related to drug law violations. In 2011, the school said 71 students -- less than 1 percent of the student population -- were disciplined for drug law violations.

Investigators are still working to determine if the students arrested Wednesday were working independently or together and who their suppliers are.

Officials said the investigation is ongoing and that more arrests are possible.

Editor’s Note: The name of one of the people involved in this case has been removed from this article because the case against him was dismissed and his records were expunged.


Previous Coverage:
Article: Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team
Article: Names Revealed in TCU Drug Bust
Article: Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges
Article: Chancellor Victor Boschnini Statement on TCU Drug Bust
Gallery: Drug Bust Mug Shots
Video: TCU Drug Bust Timeline
Video: TCU Drug Sting Nets 17 Arrests
Video: Exclusive - Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)
Video: "We Have Clear Expectations for Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.
Video: "Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief Magee
Video: Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust



Photo Credit: Fort Worth Police]]>
<![CDATA[Chancellor Victor Boschini Statement on TCU Drug Bust]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:04:07 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/tcu+logo.jpg

Below is a statement released by TCU Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr., Wednesday morning after 17 students were arrested on allegations of selling drugs.

Dear Campus Community,
 
Early today the Fort Worth Police Department and TCU Campus Police concluded an investigation into drug selling on and around campus that unfortunately led to the arrest of many current TCU students.
 
While this news is certainly shocking and disappointing, it is important to remember that TCU has clear expectations for its students: that they behave in an ethical manner, abide by campus policies and adhere to state and federal law. These students are charged with acting in a manner that is incompatible with TCU values and against the law.  That is simply unacceptable and such reported behavior is not tolerated at this University.
 
We have a responsibility to ensure that our campus environment is free of such behavior. Today's actions highlight that responsibility. The students involved were immediately separated from TCU and criminally trespassed from campus. Further, according to University policy, students arrested and found in violation of distributing drugs are subject to immediate expulsion from TCU.
 
TCU has never before experienced a magnitude of student arrests such as this. In fact, Campus Police records show only five student arrests related to drug law violations in recent years. I have asked our vice chancellor for student affairs, Dr. Kathy Cavins-Tull, to examine whether any new programs or procedures need to be implemented to curtail this type of behavior in the future. The Fort Worth Police Department also has offered to help in these efforts.
 
Today's events have forever changed the lives of the involved students, and we hope they will find a healthy way to move forward. Also, the next couple of weeks will be tough for the TCU family. There is no doubt that it will hurt to see our name associated with this type of behavior. But we must not allow this moment to define us. We must remember that we are overwhelmingly a community of dedicated students, faculty and staff and focused on changing the world through our collective work and commitment to leadership. 
 
Sincerely,
 
Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr.


Previous Coverage:
Article: Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team
Article: Names Revealed in TCU Drug Bust
Article: Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges
Article: Chancellor Victor Boschnini Statement on TCU Drug Bust
Gallery: Drug Bust Mug Shots
Video: TCU Drug Bust Timeline
Video: TCU Drug Sting Nets 17 Arrests
Video: Exclusive - Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)
Video: "We Have Clear Expectations for Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.
Video: "Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief Magee
Video: Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust

]]>
<![CDATA[Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges]]> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 18:44:06 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/TCU-Drug-Mugs-Color-NEW.jpg

Editor's Note: Fort Worth police incorrectly identified Austin Williams Carpenter, 26, as one of the 19 arrested at TCU. Fort Worth Police late Wednesday afternoon notified the media of their error. Fort Worth police said the incorrect warrant was canceled and that a corrected warrant would be issued. Police originally said 19 people were arrested but Fort Worth police said later Wednesday that only 18 people were arrested.

Arrest warrants in a drug bust on and near the campus of Texas Christian University were released Wednesday morning, just hours after 18 people were taken into police custody.

Police released 19 arrest warrants at 11 a.m. One of those warrants was later canceled, and another warrant is for a student who was not arrested and is still at large.

In addition, one person was arrested "as a result of an on-view drug violation" on suspicion of possession of marijuana. The name of that person was not released.

Police said Wednesday night that 18 arrests were made in total.

Sixteen of the people are students at the university. Four are members of the highly respected football team.

David Yendrey, Devin Johnson, Tanner Brock and Tyler Horn are the student-athletes.

The other 12 students are Bud Pollard Dillard, Cynthia (Cindy) Jaqueline Zambrano, Earl Patrick Burke, Jonathan Blake Jones (not to be confused with the Jonathan Jones on the football team), Katherine Ann Peitre, Matthew Iarossi Davis, Michael Gragg King, Peter Signavong, Richard Clay Putney, Scott (Scooter) Lee Anderson and Taylor Davis Cowdin.

Eduardo Hernandez, also arrested, is a former TCU student.

Fort Worth police originally said Hunter Wallace McLaughlin, a TCU student, had been arrested. But police said later Wednesday that McLaughlin had not been arrested and was still at large.

Below is a listing of the the accused and their alleged offenses pulled from the arrest warrants that Fort Worth police released to NBC 5 on Wednesday.

David (D.J.) W. Yendrey is a 20-year-old junior defensive tackle from Edna who plays football for TCU. According to the affidavit, Yendrey is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 3, 2011: Delivery of 1/4 ounce of marijuana. Bond set at $1,000.
  • Nov. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Nov. 10, 2011: Delivery of 1/4 ounce of marijuana. Bond set at $1,000.
  • Nov. 15, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Dec. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Jan. 19, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.

Devin Johnson is a 21-year-old junior defensive back from Oklahoma City who plays football for TCU. According to the affidavit, Johnson is accused of the following:

  • Jan. 25, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Feb. 2, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Feb. 7, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.

Tanner Wilson Brock, Jr., is a 21-year-old junior linebacker from Copperas Cove who plays football for TCU. According to the affidavit, Brock is accused of the following:

  • Jan. 19, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Jan. 25, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Feb. 1, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.

Tyler (Ty) Horn is a 21-year-old sophomore offensive tackle from McGregor who plays football for TCU. According to the affidavit, Horn is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 3, 2011: Delivery of 1/4 ounce of marijuana. Bond set at $1,000.
  • Nov. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free Zone. bond set at $5,000.

Bud Pollard Dillard is a 21-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Dillard is accused of the following:

  • Dec. 19, 2011, delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.

Cynthia (Cindy) Jaqueline Zambrano is a 19-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Zambrano is accused of the following:

  • Dec. 1, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Dec. 7, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $1,500.

Earl Patrick Burke is a 21-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Burke is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 17, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Dec. 19, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Feb. 1, 2012: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $3,000.

Hunter Wallace McLaughlin is a 24-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, McLaughlin is accused of the following:

  • Oct. 13, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Oct. 26, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Nov. 10, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Nov. 18, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Jonathan Blake Jones is a 19-year-old student at TCU. (Not to be confused with the Jonathan Jones on the football team.) According to the affidavit, Jones is accused of the following:

  • Dec. 8, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 oz and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Katherine Ann Peitre is a 20-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Peitre is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 30, 2011: Unlawful delivery. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Dec. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 oz and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Matthew Iarossi Davis is a 19-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Davis is accused of the following:

  • Jan. 18, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Jan. 24, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Jan. 26, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Feb. 7, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Michael Gragg King is a 20-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, King is accused of the following:

  • Jan. 23, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 oz and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Jan. 25, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 oz and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Feb. 1, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 oz and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Peter Signavong is a 21-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Signavong is accused of the following:

  • Oct. 12, 2011: Delivery of 1/4 oz of marijuana. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Oct. 12, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Oct. 13, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Oct. 19, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Oct. 19, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Nov. 2, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance. Bond set at $5,000.

Richard Clay Putney is a 19-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Putney is accused of the following:

  • Oct. 27, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Nov. 2, 2011: Delivery of 1/4 ounce of marijuana. Bond set at $1,000.
  • Nov. 18, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $1,500.

Scott (Scooter) Lee Anderson is a 19-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Anderson is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Nov. 10, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $3,000.
  • Nov. 16, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $5,000.
  • Nov. 17, 2011: Delivery of a controlled substance in a drug-free zone. Bond set at $3,000.

Taylor Davis Cowdin is a 20-year-old student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Cowdin is accused of the following:

  • Feb. 1, 2012: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

Eduardo Hernandez is a 20-year-old former student at TCU. According to the affidavit, Hernandez is accused of the following:

  • Nov. 17, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Dec. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Dec. 7, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.
  • Dec. 8, 2011: Delivery of between 1/4 ounce and 5 pounds of marijuana. Bond set at $1,500.

TCU Chancellor Victor Boschini said Wednesday that the students who were arrested Wednesday were immediately separated from the university and risk criminal trespassing charges should they return to campus.

All students found to be in violation of drug laws are subject to expulsion from the university.

"TCU has clear expectations for its students: That they behave in an ethical manner, abide by campus policies and adhere to state and federal law," Boschini said. "These students are accused of acting in a manner that is incompatible with TCU values, against the code of student conduct and against the law. That is simply unacceptable, and such reported behavior is not tolerated at this university."

Editor’s Note: The name of one of the people involved in this case has been removed from this article because the case against him was dismissed and his records were expunged.


Previous Coverage:
Article: Athlete Alludes to Rampant Drug Use on Team
Article: Names Revealed in TCU Drug Bust
Article: Majority of Students Face Multiple Charges
Article: Chancellor Victor Boschnini Statement on TCU Drug Bust
Gallery: Drug Bust Mug Shots
Video: TCU Drug Bust Timeline
Video: TCU Drug Sting Nets 17 Arrests
Video: Exclusive - Students Arrested in Drug Bust at TCU (Raw Video)
Video: "We Have Clear Expectations for Our Students" Chancellor Boschini, Jr.
Video: "Investigation Began 6 Months Ago" Chief Magee
Video: Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust



Photo Credit: Fort Worth Police Department]]>
<![CDATA[TCU Drug Bust Timeline]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/TCUTimeline021512_722x406_2197370610.jpg Students caught selling drugs were arrested Wednesday during an early morning bust at Texas Christian University. The arrests came after a six-month investigation prompted by complaints from students, parents and others.]]> <![CDATA[Community Differs in Reaction to TCU Drug Bust]]> Mon, 27 Feb 2012 13:03:23 -0600 http://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/TCUdrugbust_722x406_2197300709.jpg Community members react to the TCU drug bust.]]>