Rangers Bats Showed Some Life in Game 4 | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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Rangers Bats Showed Some Life in Game 4

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 12: Prince Fielder #84 of the Texas Rangers scores a run and gives teammate Will Venable #30 a five in the eighth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays in game four of the American League Division Series at Globe Life Park in Arlington on October 12, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

    It's totally understandable if you're freaking out about the Rangers' offensive ineptitude over the first four games of the ALDS against the best offensive team in baseball.

    The Rangers' bats, particularly their big ones, have been quiet throughout the series. In fact, they have two regulars hitting .300 or better over these first four games, and one of those is Adrian Beltre (.600), who has played in just more than one game after suffering back spasms early in Game 1. The other is light-hitting Delino DeShields, who is hitting right at .300 and had one hit in Game 3 before going 0-for-5 in Game 4.

    Big names like Shin-Soo Choo, Prince Fielder, Mitch Moreland and Josh Hamilton have all struggled terribly, but there have been some signs of life.

    Most obviously, Josh Hamilton got two hits in Game 3, and Choo had three in Game 4.

    Moreland hasn't really shown anything, but Fielder started to look like he was turning things around in Monday's loss.

    The hefty DH, who tied with Moreland for the team lead in homers this year and was the leader in RBIs, simply has to get things going. On Monday, he hit a couple of balls right on the screws that were simply gobbled up by Blue Jays center fielder Kevin Pillar, who's been a thorn in the side of the Rangers the entire series. He also got a hit and scored a run.

    The Rangers are going to have to score some runs on Wednesday to advance, and they can't count on Cole Hamels to be perfect. In order to win, you'd have to think the Rangers will need to score at least four runs, something they did in both Games 1 and 2 in Toronto, when they scored five and six runs, respectively.