Red Fever
Complete coverage of the Texas Rangers

Hamilton Sits Out Rangers Loss

Dunn, Humber lead White Sox past Rangers 5-2

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Eduardo Escobar made his final contribution for the first-place Chicago White Sox on Saturday night. Escobar had two hits, including an RBI double in a three-run fifth, in Chicago's 5-2 victory over the Texas Rangers and then was sent to Minnesota in a trade for left-hander Francisco Liriano.  

    Adam Dunn hit his major league-leading 31st home run and Philip Humber pitched six solid innings in leading the White Sox to their fifth straight victory.

    Humber (5-5) didn't allow a hit through three innings and won for the second time in three starts. He yielded one run, four hits and struck out four.

    The Texas native was making his first start in his home state against the Rangers. "I had a lot of friends and family here," Humber said. "It was definitely nice to pitch well here."
     

    Matt Harrison (12-6), who lost his second straight start, gave up five runs and seven hits in seven innings. The left-hander walked three and struck out four. 
     

    Josh Hamilton sat out after Rangers manager Ron Washington elected to give his slumping slugger a mental break. Hamilton is batting .145 in July and heard rare boos from his home fans after striking out twice Friday night.
     

    Adrian Beltre moved into Hamilton's third spot in the batting order, and rookie Leonys Martin played left field.  The Rangers also shuffled the middle of their lineup. Nelson Cruz hit fourth for the second time in two years, David Murphy was in the fifth spot and Michael Young batted sixth. 
       

    Mike Napoli had a solo homer and an RBI groundout for Texas, which dropped its fifth in a row to the White Sox. Humber and three relievers held the Rangers to five hits. Texas went 0 for 13 with runners in scoring position and 1 for 21 in the series.

    "If we start swinging the bat with some runners in scoring position, we can turn this thing around," Rangers manager Ron Washington said. "That's what's killing us right now."