Red Fever
Complete coverage of the Texas Rangers

Red Fever's Favorable Impact on Arlington

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The Texas Rangers are back in the playoffs and local businesses already see dollar signs.

    "We are super excited," said Carmen Barron, manager at Humperdink's Restaurant. "I mean the business is going to be insane, we're ready to go for another world series, definitely."
     
    Rangers fans and meeting planners are also cheering another year in the national spotlight.

    "The visibility is unbelievable," said Jay Burress with the Arlington Convention and Visitors Bureau. "People from around the country and the world get to hear the name 'Arlington' and 'Ballpark in Arlington' over and over. It opens many doors for us with meeting planners around the country."

    Arlington rakes in $13,000 in sales tax revenue from every sold-out game at Rangers Ballpark.

    "It's visibility, but it's also merchandise sales, it's sales tax, it's hotel occupancy tax," said Burress.

    The 2010 playoffs proved to be a real bonanza for the city, which netted an additional $1.3 million dollars in sales tax revenue, extra revenue that went straight to the city's bottom line.

    "This year's budget will have a $4 million surplus in 2012, this current budget. And last year it was about a $3 million surplus" said Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck. "So each year we've had surpluses, which is uncommon in North Texas right now."

    Organizers at a local job fair Thursday say the Rangers continued success, along with Cowboys Stadium, improves the local job picture, especially at hotels and restaurants.

    "We have had growth in our hospitality industries," said Judy McDonald with Workforce Solutions For Tarrant County."So there's usually always job opportunities. We've had like the Omni, the Gaylord, the Sheraton all still looking for people."