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Jones In Talks To Raise Titanic?

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Jones In Talks To Raise Titanic?

AP

The Titanic leaves Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912.

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Jerry Jones has already brought the world of modern art into his $1.2 billion football palace. Now, he may be making a foray into American history.

According to reports, Jones is in talks to have a piece of the RMS Titanic's hull removed from its watery grave off Newfoundland and put on display in Cowboys Stadium. The piece will be accompanied by a litany of artifacts taken from the site since its rediscovery in 1985, and may only be the first step in adding a full-fledged museum to the palatial venue.

Premier Exhibitions (formerly RMS Titanic Inc.) refused comment, but word has surfaced that the historic wreckage may be only one result of the possible partnership. One source tells NBC-DFW that the company, which also runs the controversial traveling "Bodies" exhibit, may also provide JerryWorld with "one to three" cadavers, which are preserved and then posed.

Any display in Cowboys Stadium, the source said, "would likely come in the form of a football stance or something related."

The idea, of course, is not without its critics.

Lou Everton, spokesman for the Anglo-American Historic Initiative (AAHI) says that raising any piece of the Titanic is both disrespectful to those who perished aboard the ship, and potentially disastrous for her remains.

"The whole idea is morally reprehensible," said Everton. "Taking even the smallest artifact from the site is tantamount to grave robbery, and that's to say nothing of actually raising her hull.... Microbes have been eating away at the surface of the ship for nearly 98 years now, and with any further disturbance, she could disintegrate completely in the next 50 years."

Raising any piece of the ship's hull would be a leviathan undertaking. The Titanic's remains sit about 370 miles southeast of Mistaken Point, Newfoundland, at a depth of about 2.5 miles. The inherent difficulty is just another reason why critics, like Everton, are opposed.

"Frankly, I don't think they can pull it off," Everton said. "But so much as an attempt to will be an historic blunder, the long-term ramifications of which are unimaginable."

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