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A Busy Night For The Voice Of The Cowboys

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Brad Sham has served the greater Dallas for 30 years, as "the voice of the Dallas Cowboys," a tenure that has endeared him to many therein as a sort of local treasure. Save a three year period in the mid-90s, Sham has called each Cowboys season since 1977--we're talking Jimmy Carter. We're talking the Oakland Raiders, Super Bowl champs. (I know, you young whippersnappers might not believe me... but it's true. They didn't always suck.)

    What makes this feat all the more incredible is that Sham has never sacrificed his sense of priority for the sake of business. As reported in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the sixty-year-old will use his legendary voice to read the story of Jonah and the whale at the Temple Emanu-El in North Dallas tonight--part of Yom Kippur ceremonies, a Jewish holiday of observance--before booking it to Arlington to tell the story of Dallas and the Panthers.

    "This will knock me a little bit off my routine, but that’s nothing," Sham said in the Star-Telegram. "Believe me, God is more important than my routine."

    Sham will drive to Love Field following the service, where he'll be picked up and flown to the Arlington Municipal Airport. From there, he will have a police escort to the stadium.

    Amazingly, Sham has never missed a game due to religious engagements; as pointed out in the Star-Telegram, if Dallas had played a Sunday night game this week, he would have been forced to do just that, as Yom Kippur begins at sundown Sunday night, and continues until sundown on Monday. The broadcasting veteran hopes the novelty of this particular story will serve to further a far more important message.

    "So this is a funny story because it is unusual," Sham said. "But if there is a way to send a message to people that they should not be ashamed of who they are, they should in fact be proud of who they are, and they should maybe go out of their way to practice their faith, then I’m willing to send that message."

    L'chaim.